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Hi there. I'm really a new-bee. I spoke with some experienced bee-keepers this weekend and they said that I could use plastic zipper bags on my inner cover for a feeder. Just cut some holes in the bags and put in an empty super. Have any of you done this with success? I just ordered a second hive but don't want to have to buy a second hive top feeder if I don't have to.

Thanks for your comments
 

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I've done it once. I was too nervous to make the slits as large as was recommended, but the bees ate the syrup all right. It did NOT drip into the hive, which was what I was afraid of.

I couldn't figure out how to refill the baggie, so I got a new one each time. I was using a syrup made from equal amounts of sugar and water.

I used scissors to make 2 cuts at the highest part of the baggie, and I didn't fill the baggie more than half full.
 

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Another very cheap feeder is any kind of jar the seal tight over the hole in the inner cover with several hole punched in the lid with a nail. I do not know if I ever will buy a feeder as these work great and are very cheap as most of the ones I have came out of the kitchen(food came in them).
 

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I've tried it and if it's done right it's wonderful. I ;did it wrong though. DON'T fill the bags too full--if they leak into the hive then it will come out the front and you're inviting robbers to come and get it! There's a certain way you're supposed to cut the slits--I used a razor blade on a box cutter. As stated above I like the idea of using much smaller slits and it definitely would be easier using a thicker solution.
Denise
 

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I've used bags and they work great.One problem I had was when I fed a new hived swarm and ants got in the hive and chewed holes in the bag.Otherwise I like them.Very few drowned bees.
 

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Yes the baggies are placed diectly on the top bars. Use a brand name baggie or you may be sorry. The cheaper ones dont seem to stay zipped. Gently lay the baggie down on the top bars and cut slits with a sharp razor knife.
I personally do not like this type of feeder. But the advantages are: minimal investment and no clean up. This type of feeder is best when the colony is strong enough to take in the syrup rapidly.
Disadvantages include syrup running all over the place. Once it starts it doesnt want to stop.
I consider it a good way to feed back honey since it is so thick that it wont run out of the baggie.

Its hard to find the perfect feeder!

best regards,

Kurt
 
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