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Mann Lake PF plastic frames.
Pro: Small cell, easy to scrape and restart comb, no assembly required and fairly immune to pest damage.
Con: can be harder to get drawn out, a bit too flexible and can warp in heat (left out in the sun).
 

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Pierco black waxed
easiest to see eggs, easy to scrape back to foundation every five years and start over, or when damaged, black reflects the least light providing the most natural environment -- a hive is naurally constantly dark
 

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I use mostly the ML plastic frames as I am running the small cell varroa challenge. I also like the plastic ones like ritecell and permadent. I once used many thousands of sheets of duragilt successfully. There is a learning curve on all of it.

Success usually involves putting frames of any kind on thriving expanding colony a whole box full tight together at a time. Individual foundation frames of any kind placed between two capped frames of brood result in wonderfull drawn combs every time.
 

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I usually go foundationless.

When I do use foundation, I buy Dadant small cell, primarily because the store in Waverly is nearby.

I don't know if SC fndn has an affect on varroa, as i ave never used large cell, but in several years of beekeeping I've never treated for mites, and never had varroa problems.

A distant third is Mann Lake's PF series -- the frames' are too flexible for my liking, and it doesn't get drawn as quickly and easily as foundationless frames or wax foundation.
 

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No foundation in brood boxes. Just a starter strip and let them build it the way they want to. My first nuc I put into 10 frame deep came with 5 brood frames on foundation. I put 3 frames with starter strip a d 2 frames with full foundation. They immediately built 2 frames with starter strip. They told me what they prefer. I prefer it also. Cheaper and no contaminated wax in brood frames.
 

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Black Pierco or Mann Lake foundations in wooden frames. Easy to install, good acceptance and is easy to repair damage. The drawback is that the frame is heavy, compared with all wax foundation.
 

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I like the Black plastic in wooden frames. I've used several different brands and they all seem to work fine.
Cons- they are a little harder to get drawn out. Brushing on a little bit of extra wax pretty much does away with this con though.
Pros- easy to install, the wooden frames seem to hold up better than the plastic frames in the long run, easy to scrape down and start over if needed, the black makes it easy to see eggs.
 

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Deep frames from Mann Lake (PF105) in black. Why, because they ship them to me for free and never had a problem (yet) with bees drawing them out.

Other deep frame I like is an empty deep frame, foundation-less. Just slip it in between the drawn black plastic frames and good to go!
 

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I use foundationless and have allot of PF100s. Tring to use more foundationless.

Foundationless
Pros: Fastest way to build comb
Cheaper
Less time than foundation to assemble
Less burr comb than plastic
Some cross comb, if not put between two nice frames.
They can build what they want, done or workers.

Cons: Need to assemble
If bees are not regressed to natural size, it can take some time and different stages.

ML PF100s small cell
Pros Assembled easy to pull out of box and throw it in a hive
Small cell
Easy to scrap and start over

Cons: Cost more
Lots of burr comb
build up slow, only during a flow
Some cross combing cause they don't want to use them.
Not enough wax need to add more for faster acceptance.
Gives beetles places to hide
Easy to see beetles hiding when use yellow ones
 
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