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Discussion Starter #141
Remember those bearding bees? Still at it. I came home this morning at about 8 o'clock. It stormed overnight and was still raining. I went back and checked. Yep. Still at it. Not nearly as many, but what are they thinking about? They were wet, and all lined up perfectly vertically in rows. I thought they might be dead from the cold and wet, but I poked them and they moved.
 

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Discussion Starter #142
Placed shop towels on two hives. Will watch a few days to see how the bees respond before placing on more. Randy Oliver has said that some beekeepers report bee deaths after placement. Contaminated ingredients?
 

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Discussion Starter #143
The blue shop towels are in three hives. No signs of unusual activity or abnormal numbers of dead bees. So I will put some in a few more hives.

One hive had lots of dead bees all around it (not a hive with shop towels) hundreds at least of dead bees. Also lots of fighting with yellow jackets with some obviously getting inside. I closed off the entrance to a few inches and the yellow jackets are no longer attacking the front entrance. They are still working the ground, picking up dead bees. There were a lot of immature bees being cleaned out for a few days. I wonder if that was yellow jacket activity killing them or if it is the worker bees cleaning up a problem. I have since put blue shop towels in that hive too, in case it is a mite problem.
 

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The blue shop towels are in three hives.....
What is your recipe AR?

I suspect I got at least one worthless hive that I may be better of using it as bee resource in spring time (doubt they even make it).

No payback from these slackers after the entire summer - all they had as of a couple of weeks ago - 12 frames of brood and zero stores (bone dry).
But if I spend the time and sugar feeding them slackers, maybe I should experiment on them to get at least some utility out.
 

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Discussion Starter #145
What is your recipe AR?

I suspect I got at least one worthless hive that I may be better of using it as bee resource in spring time (doubt they even make it).

No payback from these slackers after the entire summer - all they had as of a couple of weeks ago - 12 frames of brood and zero stores (bone dry).
But if I spend the time and sugar feeding them slackers, maybe I should experiment on them to get at least some utility out.
I used the recipe Randy Oliver posted:
For 10 towels 120 grams oxalic crystals, 100 ml water, 130 ml glycerine.
The water needs to be quite warm in order to dissolve the oxalix. Once dissolved, add warm glycerine. After the towels cool they are distictly moist and only a small amount of the oxalic recrystalizes.

Few of my hives have more than a little honey. No harvest this fall. Time to buy more sugar.
 

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Discussion Starter #146
Small, weak hive badly pestered by yellow jackets. None of the others seem bothered but all entrances reduced.

On that small hive even a one-bee entrance hole was not helping. Population of bees had sunk too much. I finally used steel wool to completely block the entrance. Came back the next day and the yellow jackets had pulled the steel wool apart enough to get in! I packed a thicker layer in to completely block the entrance, and gave the bees some moist sugar to eat. Probably useless. Just trying to keep them alive until I have tome to combine them with another hive. Yellow jackets now cluster along the edges trying to get in, makes it very easy to squash 4-5-6 at a time.

Weather is now distinctly cool, 40s-50s at night, with 60s-low 70s in the day. Lots of pollen coming in still. Garden still going strong, but the cantaloupes are about done, bugs getting to them, and rotting on the ground. It was an excellent year for cantaloupes. Watermelons grew great, but turned out a bit bland. Picked several today, hoping they might have ripened a bit more.

My last class prior to getting my degree finishes in a week and a half. I calculated that if I get a 30% on my final paper, I can still pass the class and graduate...that's my level of enthusiasm.
So looking forward to having time! My hospital is going bankrupt (so they say, the CEO is still getting his 6 million/year salary), so I may have LOTS of time coming up! It's nice to be nearing retirement age and having a bit of money saved. I don't mind losing my job at this stage of life. A nurse can always find work, and a few weeks or months applying for jobs would be a much-needed vacation.
 

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My last class prior to getting my degree finishes in a week and a half. I calculated that if I get a 30% on my final paper, I can still pass the class and graduate...that's my level of enthusiasm.
I got a chuckle from this. All the stress and work seem to peek right about the end. I'm sure you'll do better than 30%.
ks
 

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Discussion Starter #150
Agreed- quite an accomplishment. Congratulations on completing the degree and I do hope you are able to look for possible new employment on your own terms rather than under the reality of no job.
Completely on my own terms now. They could fire my *** tomorrow and I don't care.
 

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Discussion Starter #151
Down to 6 hives in my back yard and two at the farm, plus two given away to friends. So my year of increase is fairly successful considering how little time I had to devote to bees this year, from 4 overwintered to 10 surviving now. Very interested to see what winter brings. This rest of this fall will be devoted to building boxes, so I have enough for one on top of each hive to overwinter, stuffed full of insulation.

Lots of pollen coming in. The weather has been pretty good, cool nights and daytime temps in the 60s-70s. The bees are very active even in the cool mornings. We get frost usually in October, occasionally in late September but not this year it appears.

No signs of yellow jackets excessively pestering the bees. The few I see get immediately mobbed and chased away. They look dejected and are not trying hard to get in. I found a fun way to kill yellow jackets. I had left out some caked sugar and noticed yellow jackets and other wasps thick on it. No bees. So I started carrying a fly swatter with me and a few quick whacks gets a handful every time. The element of danger increases the fun.

I passed my last class in nursing school for my BSN. Graduation date is in November.
 

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Caked sugar will cut down on robbing. The first hunters find the sugar to be an easier target than hives and seem to settle for easy over plentiful.
 

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I'm a retired RN. The nice thing about nursing is the choice of specialties you can try out. I worked in a teaching hospital the last 20 years, always something interesting going on. I worked in adult medicine, adult surgery, post-anesthesia unit, drug study coordinator, pediatric clinic, pediatric medicine, PICU, and utilization review all at the same big hospital.
Some nurses worked from home doing work for medical insurance companies, workers comp, and UR. Also traveling nurses are making great money these days due to the coronavirus. Some nurses I worked with traveled to San Antonio, TX back in the 2000's when they had a shortage of nurses and were making $60-75/hr working in a ICU.
When will you take the nursing board exam?

Anyway it looks like the warm weather is taking a break this week, after today's rain here in Georgia it will actually be cool and dry for the next two weeks. Yay!

I use wax moth traps and they really pull in the wasps, yellow jackets, hornets and those big horseflies as well as the moths.
1 cup water, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup cider vinegar, one cut up banana peel. Drill a one inch hole in a plastic bottle just below the curve of the neck. Hang them up within a few feet of the hives.
 

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Discussion Starter #154
I'm a retired RN. The nice thing about nursing is the choice of specialties you can try out. I worked in a teaching hospital the last 20 years, always something interesting going on. I worked in adult medicine, adult surgery, post-anesthesia unit, drug study coordinator, pediatric clinic, pediatric medicine, PICU, and utilization review all at the same big hospital.
Some nurses worked from home doing work for medical insurance companies, workers comp, and UR. Also traveling nurses are making great money these days due to the coronavirus. Some nurses I worked with traveled to San Antonio, TX back in the 2000's when they had a shortage of nurses and were making $60-75/hr working in a ICU.
When will you take the nursing board exam?

Anyway it looks like the warm weather is taking a break this week, after today's rain here in Georgia it will actually be cool and dry for the next two weeks. Yay!

I use wax moth traps and they really pull in the wasps, yellow jackets, hornets and those big horseflies as well as the moths.
1 cup water, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup cider vinegar, one cut up banana peel. Drill a one inch hole in a plastic bottle just below the curve of the neck. Hang them up within a few feet of the hives.
Sounds like you had a good career! I am already licensed, started with an ADN 5 years ago, hospitals wants everyone to get a BSN so I went. I am in cardiac telemetry/stroke, currently working on the step-down ICU. Spent all spring and summer working the corona virus unit. Thankfully that is done, at least for now.

I tried a wasp trap last year and didn't catch much. Maybe try again if they start getting bad again. They did nearly kill one little hive, that I ended up combining.
 

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Congratulations on securing your BSN, AR1. Best of success to you in your career endeavors going forward.
 

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Discussion Starter #156
90% of effort is spent on the weakest 10% of hives.

If I had 100 hives I would probably just let it die.

Yellow jackets back pestering one hive. I noticed that they fly a lot earlier in the morning and in much cooler weather than bees, so I think that is when they get started getting inside hives, when the guard bees are chilled and dopey. Cut entrances back to one bee hole and a narrow gap between boxes. Tomorrow will open it up to see how much is left.

Had a corona patient last two nights at work. Fortunately not serious and already on the mend. I am always a hypochondriac for a day or two after a corona patient.
 

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Discussion Starter #157
You don't know till you look! Of the hives at home none have much honey, a few partial frames at best. Time to buy some sugar. All appear queen right and have small patches of brood. One hive, strong all year, I had to reduce to a 5-frame nuc. They got badly hurt a month or so ago in a war with yellow jackets. Now they have a tiny slot for an entrance and fill the space. Every hive seems to have a few hive beetles, but they don't seem to be reproducing. All I have seen are large adults, no small ones.

The 2 hives at the farm look much better. Full of bees with honey stores.

Garden is almost done. Picked the last watermelons, still good and not overripe. Harvested some dried beans and sweetcorn for next year's seed. Still some lettuce, and that may last another month if the freeze isn't too hard. A few tomatoes and greens. Not a bad year considering nothing got planted before mid-June.
 

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Discussion Starter #158
First frost was on October 4th. Very light frost, only a few zucchini leaves dead.

Lots of pollen going in, and the hives are very active.
 

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Same here, sweet potatoes.

I know, bad picture. Frost asters and smart weed still being worked hard by the bees.
Cheers
gww
 

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Discussion Starter #160
Pretty much how the zucchinis look, maybe not quite that toasted. It didn't even touch the tomatoes so it must have been a very light frost.

I have tried sweet potatoes, but the woodchucks and deer like them too much. I'd shoot the chucks, they live under the barn foundation and I am afraid they will cause structural damage eventually, but they are too wary and fast for me. Heck, I'd shoot the deer too, but first day of hunting season they are gone like smoke. You can see a whole herd of them every day all summer, but as soon as the first arrow flies, no sign of them.
 
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