Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
421 - 434 of 434 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,606 Posts
Ar1
I think the 1918 had a very robust second year and it might be just how it cycles and how long from the beginning it takes to make it every where. Sorta like armadillos in mo, none 20 years ago and now dead on the road all the time. Many got sick with out even knowing it and ,animals?, could be involved along with it not being novel and more people tired of staying home and schools and and and.

Sorta makes sense in my mind when starting at zero and making an effort early to track and contact that might not be going on now due to the numbers involved.

Either way, nice to hear from someone whos job is affected by it to at least relate what they personally see even though every thing seen is not guaranteed to be the whole picture just like not every area is affected by chronic wasting disease in deer.

Similar things could also could also be taken into account in our bee populations and count for differing experiences by us though given time all may get a taste of all the experiences possible.

I do also think that the more success early on of getting lucky enough to have been avoiding problems with sickness in people or bees can cause a loss of fear and might make for more brashness till it is too late. Might start thinking it can't happen to me and act accordingly.

That seems to be what most treatment free bee keepers report or in fact even most bee keepers get some kind of bad turn somewhere along the line even if it does not happen every time. Don't get me wrong, I am still keeping the bees the same as I always did or worse and willing to see what happens. I did get the vaccine but I also still smoke.
Cheers
gww
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #422 ·
Ah. Got it.


... 83.3% for combined infection- and vaccine-induced antibodies in May 2021... So by May 2021, 83% had 'immunity' from covid, either shots or disease. It must have been very irregularly distributed geographically, or, breakthrough cases are far more common than we had thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #423 ·
Since placing the queen excluder screen on the front of the hive I have not seen any dead bumble bees, nor have I seen more than a few bumbles investigating the hive entrance, so it seems to be working.

Yellow jackets continue to be very common, but for some reason are avoiding my traps. Went from 30-40 YJs/day in 3 traps to 2-3 in 4 traps. Bait unchanged from before, honeycomb, apple and watermelon. I added one trap with a piece of raw chicken. That one has caught lots of flies, and zero YJs. It is starting to get stinky. I have not seen any YJs entering the hives, yet.

Weather remains very dry. Lots of pollen coming in, but not much honey stored.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #424 ·
Finally a decent rain.
Got into all 3 hives today. Not a lot of changes. There is some honey stored, mostly in the lowest boxes, and little in the upper. Lots of pollen. Looks like very little brood right now, a few small patches in the middle of the brood boxes. More eggs laid so we may be getting a larger fall brood going.

The weakest hive, from a swarm, is gradually increasing numbers. The bottom deep is completely full of bees and they have started putting some honey in a few frames up top. Getting more hopeful for this hive. They had a rocky start with a bad queen and some laying workers, but made a queen from a frame of brood I put in.

Saw one bee with a mite on it. Picked the bee off and squashed it. No signs of wing problems and didn't see any other mites with close inspection of all frames. This hive has OA shop towels. They are getting pretty covered in propolis, so I scraped them off and tucked the scraps between the frames to force the bees to deal with them. Time to make another batch though. This hive has one frame with maybe a two-inch area of capped brood, and only eggs elsewhere that I could see. So the great majority of the mites should be on adult bees.

Zero yellow jackets going into the traps. I was eating outdoors, a rib, and within seconds YJs were homing in on that meat. So I left a little meat on the bone and dropped it into a trap. Zero results. So far they reject raw chicken, raw pork, cooked pork, and fruit. I see them scavenging dead bees off the concrete. Maybe I should load a trap with dead bees, but I don't have many handy.

Garden is closing down except for greens. May get a late green bean crop. The watermelons were plentiful but poor quality this year, mushy and not sweet. Only one really good one so far, but have a bunch sitting in the garage so may get a few more good ones. Cantaloupe were good, mostly, but the last few were quite bitter and we threw them away. No more until next July. Picked and husked the last corn for next year's seed. Very good corn year in spite of the drought.

Busy at work with COVID again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,808 Posts
Finally a decent rain.
Same here- I was thankful to receive it.

Sorry to hear that COVID is on the rise where you are. It is still high around here, but finally starting to slowly recede.

After two recent trips to the E/R, I was very impressed with how kind and unfailingly professional everyone was despite the obvious stress and high workload- you're doing yeoman's work.

All my wife's nursing friends comment that she should be glad she's not working in the field anymore- I hate to hear that so many in this profession feel that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,515 Posts
This hive has one frame with maybe a two-inch area of capped brood, and only eggs elsewhere that I could see. So the great majority of the mites should be on adult bees.
Then why don't you OAD - perfect timing.
You already have been doing OAM on them - just dribble given this opportunity and call it the season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #427 ·
Then why don't you OAD - perfect timing.
You already have been doing OAM on them - just dribble given this opportunity and call it the season.
What? And risk learning something new?
Actually I have been thinking about doing just that. Tomorrow is a day off of work so I have time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #428 ·
Same here- I was thankful to receive it.

Sorry to hear that COVID is on the rise where you are. It is still high around here, but finally starting to slowly recede.

After two recent trips to the E/R, I was very impressed with how kind and unfailingly professional everyone was despite the obvious stress and high workload- you're doing yeoman's work.

All my wife's nursing friends comment that she should be glad she's not working in the field anymore- I hate to hear that so many in this profession feel that way.
Hope your ER trips were nothing too serious!

Re the nursing profession, the workload doesn't bother me, but getting a 'raise' that is considerably lower than the rate of inflation sure does. The bean-counters don't appear to understand that the reason why we have lost so many experienced staff, and are not retaining our new hires any longer than it takes them to get trained, is that we all know we can make a lot more money just by tossing out a few resumes, or going on the road as travel nurses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,515 Posts
What? And risk learning something new?
Actually I have been thinking about doing just that. Tomorrow is a day off of work so I have time.
Right; what about learning something new? :)
I have quickly become a fan of OAD (the procedure itself) - it is simply done while doing a routine inspection IF the colony is brood-less (or near brood-less).

I have since bought a bottle of lactic acid on Amazon and thinking of a possible LAD in pre-winter on brood-less colonies.
Ideally, it would be the colonies with terminal mite counts where I have nothing left to loose and might as well give it a try.
The lactic acid is food grade for wine/beer making - not a contaminant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #430 ·
Right; what about learning something new? :)
I have quickly become a fan of OAD (the procedure itself) - it is simply done while doing a routine inspection IF the colony is brood-less (or near brood-less).

I have since bought a bottle of lactic acid on Amazon and thinking of a possible LAD in pre-winter on brood-less colonies.
Ideally, it would be the colonies with terminal mite counts where I have nothing left to loose and might as well give it a try.
The lactic acid is food grade for wine/beer making - not a contaminant.
I looked up Randy Oliver's version, looks pretty easy. Now to get some syringes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,808 Posts
Hope your ER trips were nothing too serious!
Thanks, AR1. For myself I had a bout of passing-out 3 times in a 24 hour period followed by the feeling I had an anvil on my chest. After a battery of tests they concluded I have some condition they want to confirm with a 'tilt table test' at a cost of $8.1K. My primary care physician said it was benign, so I'll pass on the test. Thankfully no more passing-out.

Then, our 4 year old son got really sick with what turned out to be RSV and Pneumonia. He got to spend almost a week at Vandervilt Children's Hospital, but is now thankfully back to his happy, energetic self.

In both cases, our medical team were connsumate professionals and demonstrated a great deal of skill and care. Made me really appreciate the work you're doing.

BTW, my E/R nurse was a guy from Arkansas- said he was killing it doing travel nursing and that it suited his current season in life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
I looked up Randy Oliver's version, looks pretty easy. Now to get some syringes.
I was going to go the spray bottle route, I like it, but, since I already had the syringes, due to cattle meds. I decided to go ahead today and do my first ever OA dribble.

Other than getting over my 'nervous nellie' hesitancy to mix an acid, it was painless and very easy. I filled all three syringes, walked out to the hives and in 2 min. they were done. I read Randy Olivers write up on how to safely use OA and it brought me down to earth.

I learned something new today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Discussion Starter · #434 ·
Saw something a bit odd today. A bee was scouring the patio concrete, picking up and removing bits and pieces of dead bees. She kept at it quite a while in a search pattern all around the hive. Never saw that behavior before. I have seen bees drag out a dead bee, drop it and then go pick it up and fly away with it. But never a bee cleaning up every random bit on the ground.

These bees seem the neatest and cleanest bees I have had, and the insides of the hives are spotless, nothing at all left on the floor. Kind of like when you visit someones house and you immediately know if they are clean fanatics, average neat, or kind of lazy about it all. These bees make my wife look like a slob, and my wife leans towards the fanatic clean side!
 
421 - 434 of 434 Posts
Top