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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wasn't planning on inspecting the hives this weekend, but thought last minute I'd take a look at the beeyard yesterday and WOW - am i glad I did. Imagine my shock (and dismay) as I'm driving up and I notice my strongest over-wintered colony completely topped over!

My mind was racing through all the scenarios that could have caused this as I rushed to get my veil on. Was it a bear? nope. Vandals? don't think so. Wind? Seems unlikely but has to be the explanation.

I ended up creating a walk-away split by dividing up the resources between 2 hives ... I have no idea which hive contains the queen. It was amazing that the bees were still trying to do what they do, despite the boxes being upside down, inside out and half strewn around.

Fingers crossed I'm able to make lemonade from lemons here! Anyone have a similar experience?

IMG_1429.jpg
 

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I have had wind blow hives over here. On the level probably soft ground in the picture One corner probably sunk in a soft spot. Your plan is workable. Hopefully your queen survived the tumble and you only have one queen to raise and get mated. I would keep an eye on the hives as one or both may need supered. In about four weeks you should have a mated queen in one or both of them. Just remember that in about twenty percent of the time, bees fail to get a queen raised and properly mated. If that happens, just recombine.
 

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And here you go - we just discussed the safety issues.
Use those $2 straps from Harbor Freight, what not - the hive will stay together the next time it tumbles over.
Like so:
20180924_183829.jpg
 

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I had to do this a couple of weeks ago, and since it happened while I was out of town they sat toppled for 10-12 days. One note if this happens to anyone else, position yourself so you're not standing where the hives were situated on the ground when you finesse them back together on the stand. The returning foragers will not immediately figure out that the hive is upright again, and they'll be circling over where the hive used to sit.

That said, the girls on the frames were as calm as could be.
 

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I鈥檒l second the suggestion for a cheap strap over the hive. I鈥檝e had a couple hives toppled over in the winter and the straps kept them intact for the most part. I was able to stand them back up without separating the boxes, and they survived the ordeal. It鈥檚 cheap insurance.
 

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I would say your bottom board could have been part of the problem. That back 2x scoots off the back of the cinder blocks could cause a tumble.
 

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I would say your bottom board could have been part of the problem. That back 2x scoots off the back of the cinder blocks could cause a tumble.
That was my thought too. It looks like the cinder blocks need to be adjusted so the hive sits on the block centers, not the edge.
 

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That is why I like to use benches for holding hives. All I have to do is dig 3 post holes and drop the bench in, level it and fill the holes. With cinder blocks, you have to level the ground for each hive and you can't secure it with straps unless you sink anchors on each side of the hive. Way too much work!
Plus, if the land owner tells me to remove the hives, it is easy to pry the bench out of the ground.
Bee_Stand_Small.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
good suggestions.

I have a 2x4 hive stand that fits 3 hives on it behind, but didn't get around to putting another one together, hence the cinder blocks! It was supposed to be temporary, but ... you know how that goes. I'll definitely be changing this up soon to avoid the same thing happening again.
 
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