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I keep having more questions about Snelgrove use. (Disclaimer: I have NOT read the original Snelgrove, but I have read Wally Shaw's paper.)

If it works in the "Pre-emptive swam method" to put the queen below with all the flying bees right away, then should there be any problem, in the "Swarm-stopping method" with moving the queen below on any day after the first day? The method calls for waiting until the flying bees have a newly capped queen cell (D7-10) before removing those frames and putting the queen below. I wonder why it wouldn't work to do the same on D5 - it's just that a partial cell would be removed and destroyed. Also, is there any reason to expect that the flying bees might reject the queen after being separated from her for several days?

Or alternatively, instead of putting the queen back downstairs on D8-10, just removing the brood frame which the flying bees may be making queen cells on, and replacing it with a frame of eggs? You could maybe prolong the Snelgrove split this way, keeping the flying bees mostly collecting nectar and not having to deal with more than a minimum of brood rearing.

Another question: who recombines the Snelgrove-split hive in time for the main flow? Wonder how to keep swarm preps from resuming in this case, and instead getting a good strong productive colony. I think Crofter may have mentioned this.
 

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I have not done a side by side comparison of Snelgroves original text with what is in Wally Shaws rendition. Snelgrove stressed the significance of the demographic redistribution of bee age groups in altering their behavior. I dont think you can do mix and match changes to the physical layouts without expecting variation in anticipated results. For instance it would make a huge difference in outcomes if your older bees were oriented to upper rear entrances rather than to lower front. Their instinctive loyalties can power the separation of key ingredients. Rearranging those ingredients can cause emergency cell starting, or the tearing down of cells if queen replacement would compromise the situation the bees find themselves in after you have changed their reality.

Regarding your last question I think that recombining the separated parts of the colony would put you back in at least as likely a swarm promoting condition. It would undo the temporary demographic separation that dampered the swarm motivation in the first place.

I am having difficulty understanding the rationale of some of the alternate route changes you suggest. If you download Snelgroves manuscript as a PDF., Method I and Method II gives the reasoning of how the bees will react to each scenario and give you the answers to what the expected outcome should usually be. You may be confusing things by being too devious with your moves.:)
 
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