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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In early December I stopped by one yard just to see what's going on. Around 70% of the hives in the yard were knocked over. I had some extra drawn frames being stored in that yard and those were taken, as well as feeders. They didn't take any hive bodies since pretty much all were homemade 7 or 8 frame boxes. Last time I was in that yard was a little more than 3 weeks prior. Mice moved into some knocked over boxes and damaged some of the frames. All hives were still alive, but the clusters were small-ish, so I combined what I thought wasn't populous enough to make a decent colony.
Anyways, I'm left with honey frames that won't be needed by the bees now. The honey is thick and cold. Other than a hot room or warming cabinet, how can I warm up the frames to extract the honey? Few days ago I put them in a room that stays at about 83 degrees consistently.
 

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Unless you just want to extract now, can you possibly get them on top of other hives in other yards to let the bees keep them protected until your next regular extraction? Otherwise, I would think you could get 83 degree honey to spin out of the frames. Might just take a while longer than usual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Unless you just want to extract now, can you possibly get them on top of other hives in other yards to let the bees keep them protected until your next regular extraction? Otherwise, I would think you could get 83 degree honey to spin out of the frames. Might just take a while longer than usual.
I could do that. And I do intend to hold on to some frames as winter/emergency food for other colonies.

Thanks oldtimer.
 

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You could sterilize the honey. Especially if its had contact with mice or other critters. (Was it really a vandal or something like a bear?)

And keep it separate from the other honey.

Its not a big deal, but why take chances?

You never know what a vandal might put in there. Plus when sterilizing, a lot of extra stuff should boil out. (Water has a high boiling point; often other things will cook out by the time its boiling and sterile.)
 

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You could sterilize the honey. Especially if its had contact with mice or other critters. (Was it really a vandal or something like a bear?)

And keep it separate from the other honey.

Its not a big deal, but why take chances?

You never know what a vandal might put in there. Plus when sterilizing, a lot of extra stuff should boil out. (Water has a high boiling point; often other things will cook out by the time its boiling and sterile.)
Sorry, this is is not good advice. Anyone that has extracted honey knows the nature of the stuff the strainer catches...Honey is naturally anti-microbial, it does not ever need to be "sterilized". If one suspects that an insecticide has been applied to the comb by vandals, the frames, combs, and honey should all be destroyed.
 

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As far as extracting, why not stack the supers in one stack with a light bulb inside at the bottom.
It would heat all the honey and make it easier to extract.
 

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Sorry, this is is not good advice. Anyone that has extracted honey knows the nature of the stuff the strainer catches...Honey is naturally anti-microbial, it does not ever need to be "sterilized". If one suspects that an insecticide has been applied to the comb by vandals, the frames, combs, and honey should all be destroyed.
You are welcome to disagree.

I think he wants to talk about though, or he wouldn't have posted.
 

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Anyone that has extracted honey knows the nature of the stuff the strainer catches...Honey is naturally anti-microbial, it does not ever need to be "sterilized".
I agree with this advise. You will basically destroy the honey if you boil it. The only care once should take with honey is dilution. Moisture content is the only thing that can spoil honey. Chemical contaminants is another thing altogether and there is no easy way to remove them from honey.

OP,

I would store them on top of a strong colony if you don't need honey. I generally store the extra honey frames from the late dead outs every year like this. Or if you must extract then use the light bulb trick someone mentioned. I would use an empty super/deep where the light bulb sits otherwise you may melt the comb in the first bottom box near the bulb.
 

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Unless you are 100% sure there is no Leptospirosis in your area. All honey needs to be dumped. Even the frames of honey you put back in the hives. You have no idea where the mice peed
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Unless you are 100% sure there is no Leptospirosis in your area. All honey needs to be dumped. Even the frames of honey you put back in the hives. You have no idea where the mice peed
Thanks.
To clarify, the mice nest was made in the brood frames. I didn't find any mice damage or nesting materials on the honey frames.
 

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Sorry to hear, from your post I assume it was people who knocked over your hives. We have had bear issues in the past. Never problems with people. I have heard of issues from raccoons but never had that problem either. Was anything missing? Are you sure you did not have a wind storm?
Anyway we use ratchet straps to secure everything together, Harbor Freight a couple of bucks apiece. A bear can rip them apart, people can undo but otherwise they will stay together.
 

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Unfortunately you have no idea where they walked.. we have a habit here because of vermin. Always wash dishes before you use.
The risk is not worth it.
Happy holidays to all
 
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