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In my second year of keeping bees I have not produced an ounce of extra honey. The reason for this is because once my hives are two deeps strong I split them into nucs. I want to first become independent and learn to produce bees rather than rely on packages and so on. That being said, next year I will dedicate a small percentage of hives to honey production in yards that seem to have an exceptional nectar flow. I am wondering if there is an average ratio of honey produced vs honey for the land owners? I wish to be generous to the people that let me keep bees on their property without shooting myself in the foot. I really appreciate your input in advance.
 

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I generally offer a quart per hive at harvest time. If they are particularly helpful (mowing, let me put out swarm traps, offer to help carry things, call if something doesn't look right, etc.) and go out of their way to make things easy for me I will drop off another pound or some creamed honey several times a year when I come for a visit.
 

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Ask them what they want. Maybe they don't want any honey from you. Maybe they don't eat honey or like honey. Maybe they just like having the bees there because they have heard how all the bees are dying. Does it really matter what others do or what is traditional? Your landowners don't know what others do or what is traditional. Maybe they would like a nice basket of fruit w/ a jar of honey and a squeeze bear in it. Or a bottle of mead. Or a chunk of comb honey right from the bees on their own property. Something personal.

People like to be appreciated. Get to know your landowners as people and find out what they would like.

Or just give them a 5lb jar of honey or two.
 

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for years a 5 lb. jar was called "a rent jar". but as stated above make it personal. one large local farm family group provided a large migratory operator with many yard sites over miles. they had 60 lb. buckets appear several times a year. not an exact answer here.
 

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Lot rent can vary widely. I have an out yard at a tree farm the gent who owns it does not eat honey, I told it to give it to friends as Christmas gifts. but he just refuses to take it. To him the bees and the friendship that has developed between him and I is ample payment. I do not insist on paying him because I do not want to offend him.

I have another yard on a farm. The gent actually called me to put the hives there. It is a great location and produces bocoo honey. He asked me to place the hives so I do not consider that I rent the spot. However one day he was obviously about to be in trouble as he had a lot of hay down, and they were calling for rain. seeing this I went home and got my tractor and baler and helped him out. Ever since them he calls me to let me know he is doing hay and I go help. So the cost for that yard is actually quite high. But I enjoy doing it. I have a few hives at a friends place. Mostly where I take my splits, I am old school and like to move them a few miles from the parent hive for a while, for this yard I give them a few 1 pound jars a year.

The jist of it all is for most folks allowing one to keep bees on their land see it as a way of contributing to nature and the community at large. Any offering shows appreciation. Keep it friendly and neighborly and you will always be welcome!

P.S. Don't boast about how much honey you collect each year. You never know how one will interpret it. They do not understand all the cost of keeping bees.
 

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Ask them what they want. Maybe they don't want any honey from you. Maybe they don't eat honey or like honey. Maybe they just like having the bees there because they have heard how all the bees are dying. Does it really matter what others do or what is traditional? Your landowners don't know what others do or what is traditional. Maybe they would like a nice basket of fruit w/ a jar of honey and a squeeze bear in it. Or a bottle of mead. Or a chunk of comb honey right from the bees on their own property. Something personal.

People like to be appreciated. Get to know your landowners as people and find out what they would like.

Or just give them a 5lb jar of honey or two.
Mark I do have to say that yours is one of the best answers on beesourece all year long....


Perfect answer. One needs to be flexible and be willing to fit the land owners needs and wishes.

To give a great example.... I have a yard that is currently owned by three cousins. This fall will be my 25th year there. Its my best location hands down. Before one of the old uncles died a few years back he would ask for just a few jars of honey a year. He would open them up and put them on the edge of the back porch and enjoyed his final days as a 95 year old gentleman watching the ants coming and going from those jars while he was sitting in his chair staring at the woodlands behind the ants as they marched to and fro. When I first saw this it drove me nuts but I soon realized its was what made his happy clock tick.

Merv was as guy who was a multimillionaire but lived very contently as would any happy pauper. He loved watching the bees and felt the same way about those darn ants... Lived a life enjoying people and the tiniest critters in Gods great creation. A few jars of honey feeding the ants fit his bill. Nothing more and nothing less.

The current owners all live the same way.

Since this yard has been so invaluable to my operation ( would rent for over a thousand bucks a month on the open market considering its location) and they have never asked for nearly a red cent for the whole 25 years there I recently offered them an all expense paid trip to "visit" some of our Alaskan bee yards and the associated nearby hot springs)

Like the humble folks they are they said it was way beyond to generous of an offer from me and that they would rather have me jump for a nice dinner out at the local steakhouse as a token ( small one at that) of my appreciation. The trip to AK is still on the table as an offer as far as I'm concerned but the steakhouse is what they'd like so the steakhouse is what they will get. :)

:shhhh:
 

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Some great answers here! I too find that it is not always honey that the land owners want although most greatly appreciate a case or two of honey. Each yard is so different. Some folks are pleased with just a jar, perhaps they are just being polite and do not really like honey, others like a couple cases to share with family. I am a guest on their property and make a point of stopping to say hello every once and while and ask if they need more honey or just to see how things are going. Some may just want to wear the extra veil to look inside a hive with you. Without landowners willing to share their property, beekeeping would be a lot harder! Take good care of them.
 
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