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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a first yr BK I have 1 hive. I checked them almost every week for about 2 months a lot of you guys and gals told me not to so I stopped checking so much, I checked about a month ago and could not find the queen and the bee pop was getting low. I thought that they might have swarmed or at the min the queen left/died. You all said to wait about 3 weeks because I might have a virgin queen, I did wait and checked this weekend and the bee pop is going good I have two full brood deeps that are all drawn out, I am thinking of taken 1 if not 2 frames out and taken honey because I am worried about them becoming honey bound, I still have not found the queen but she has to be there. I still have found no mites, not sure if the mite pop is that low or if there is not any mites. So to my questions. With there being at least 13 frames of full honey (brood frames) how do I save the frames for them for winter? From my reading/understanding first yr hives r not suppose to swarm and produce this much honey. This may sound like a stupid question but with all of this high productivity for the first yr will I have to be on high alert next yr? Also with finding no mites yet is that also normal or am I just one of those 1% who got lucky?
 

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I am a first yr BK I have 1 hive. I checked them almost every week for about 2 months a lot of you guys and gals told me not to so I stopped checking so much, I checked about a month ago and could not find the queen and the bee pop was getting low. I thought that they might have swarmed or at the min the queen left/died. You all said to wait about 3 weeks because I might have a virgin queen, I did wait and checked this weekend and the bee pop is going good I have two full brood deeps that are all drawn out, I am thinking of taken 1 if not 2 frames out and taken honey because I am worried about them becoming honey bound, I still have not found the queen but she has to be there. I still have found no mites, not sure if the mite pop is that low or if there is not any mites. So to my questions. With there being at least 13 frames of full honey (brood frames) how do I save the frames for them for winter? From my reading/understanding first yr hives r not suppose to swarm and produce this much honey. This may sound like a stupid question but with all of this high productivity for the first yr will I have to be on high alert next yr? Also with finding no mites yet is that also normal or am I just one of those 1% who got lucky?
Store frames in a freezer if you remove any. Kills any pest that could destroy them once they are not where the bees can watch them. Once frozen they can be removed and put in plastic bags to protect them. I have a freezer for this so I just leave them in the freezer. How are you checking for mites? If you are looking at them, they are very difficult to see. A sticky board in the bottom or a sugar or alcohol bath is the only way to be sure. I prefer the sticky board, not as accurate but not nearly as much work and it doesn’t kill bees. Not sure where you are, but here in north Florida the summer dearth is going strong , so there isn’t much chance of the bees becoming so honey bound they will swarm at this point. I wouldn’t worry so much this year, but if your hive is booming at the start of spring, you should split it and get yourself a second hive. You really need two hives so you can swipe resources from one if the other needs help. Don’t struggle looking for the queen, you don’t have to see her, if you see eggs, larva, she was there a few days ago… Once you see her a couple of times, it will get easier.
 

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From the perspective of "testing" for varroa, is there some kind of sticky paper that one can put on the bottom of the hive that's strong enough to catch the mites but not so strong that the bees will also stick to it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
estreya from what i know of sticky boards they r under the screen mess so bees do not make contact with the sticky board. so if i freeze the honey i can reuse it in the spring or winter for the bees?
 

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13 full frames of honey seems like an extraordinarily high amount; seeing honey on all frames is pretty much normal but doesn't mean that the hive is honey bound. Is there a reason why you didn't put on a honey super? If you do have very heavy frames with capped honey covering each side, yes, they should come out and go into the freezer. If it's just a couple of inches of honey on the top of the frames, you can ignore it.

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>From the perspective of "testing" for varroa, is there some kind of sticky paper that one can put on the bottom of the hive that's strong enough to catch the mites but not so strong that the bees will also stick to it?

http://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=352

The secret is the mesh that the bees can use to walk on and use to get loose if they step on the sticky paper.
 

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estreya from what i know of sticky boards they r under the screen mess so bees do not make contact with the sticky board. so if i freeze the honey i can reuse it in the spring or winter for the bees?
Yep, freezing doesn't hurt the honey, but it kills anything in the comb that can ruin the honey. Plastic bags on tight will keep them out after the freezing has killed any eggs or larva.
I take mine out the day before and let it warm up for a day, then put it on the hive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Checked the hive today, handing out spoon fulls of honey to my family. While checking the hive guess what I saw, the QUEEN!!. She is a unmarked one so yes my old queen died or swarmed. However this queen is twice the size of the old one. Is it possible that the old one was artificially inseminated? And to correct what i said be4 as far as having 13 frames i have more like 10 ful ones if i was to combine all the honey together. I saw queen, low drone pop and some brood.
 

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Probably not. Artificial insemination is generally used for breeder queens. It is possible that the queen was artificially inseminated, but it was probably just an early queen, or just a small queen.
 
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