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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What did I do wrong?:doh:

http://community.webshots.com/album/577829894EDYsWl

I had two strong hives. They were survivor hives that I picked up. I robbed them last week, then put a wet box back on each. This morning I opened them to find thousands of small white worms, some larger worms also. And no bees, they took off. What kind of worms are these? What do I need to do to them?

In another yard I robbed two other hives and put the wet boxes back on them. But with very different results, the other two are fine. And refilling those boxes.
 

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The look like wax moth larva, they make a mess out of the hive by tunneling threw the comb defecating as the go. If the infestation over whelms the bees they will abscond. What don’t make sense is you mentioned strong hives, this is usually the best defense against wax moths or small hive beetles.
 

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let me just say the only larvae I like is bee larvae. I hope you can eradicate them from your hive. I agree they look like waxmoths.From what i have read deep freezer for 10 day will kill all life stages.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is there anything I can do other than 10 days in the freezer?

Also are they going to infest the rest of the apiary?
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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The question is what happened to your bees. With no bees to gaurd them and wet supers they were bound to end up fill of wax moths or small hive beetle larvae. No, they will not "infest" your other hives unless they are failing or absent. You can put them out in the sun and that will kill the moths, but it will also melt the comb... you can spray them with Bt (certan, etc.). Freezing is by far the most effective.
 

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I'm betting small hive beetle larvae. I don't see any of the webbing typical with wax moths. With a shb infestation, the larvae travel through the comb consuming anything and everything. When they defecate in the honey it begins fermenting, smells awful, the bees find it offensive and abandon the nest.
 

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As Michael mentioned, your wax moth worms were probably in your wet super that you added, and they overwhelmed the bees, who absconded. The other hives are doing fine because, luck of the draw, wax moths hadn't laid many eggs in there for the population to explode. Keep your stored supers and comb protected!
Regards,
Steven
 
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