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Will be fine. A dab of polyurethane glue or caulk will fill any holes that you don't want.
 

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In 1996 hot I pressure washed antique oak beams for a construction job. All kinds of beetles and worms came out. The contractor loaded them up and out to a fumigator before using them for the residence.
I once made covers out of cedar pallet lumber. They rotted within 5 years.
 

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If you can wait, you can also put them out in your yard in summertime, tarped over with a black cover, and cook them out... Essentially creating a lumber kiln. Won't be anything alive left in there after a few weeks in the sun :)
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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You really won't know what kind of condition the wood is in until it is sawn into boards. If it is full of small holes but otherwise sound, saltybee's advice seems right to me. If the holes are real small, the bees will take care of them.
 

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Have quite a bit of old pine logs. Any issue using this pine for boxes? Will be chewed with some small holes. Thoughts?
I would not worry a bit.
I'd take your wood with holes if I only could.

A matter of fact - old time beeks SEARCHED for dead wood of spongy/holly structure.
It was not an easy find because such wood is not made into typical lumber.

My own Dad showed me how our own Dadant hives all had the internal walls constructed of exact such wood.
Some sort of dry-rot spruce, but yet it was solid enough for the internal walls (double-wall construction).

Why?
Because porous wood is good natural insulator (not the same as the "chewed with some small holes", but still a non-issue).
 

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Sounds like a lot of work relative to how long the boxes might last...but I'm not a restorer-type.
 

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I would use the wood
if the holes are an issue for you then there are ways.... you can mix sawdust with glue and paste the holes with that, if there is a lot, of holes, caulk could work.
I take my hive cleaning scraps and melt them, paste the insides with a wax propolis mix. for lids with tin over the holes are a bit of ventilation.
exterior: caulk, glue , sawdust paint, interior: wax, propolis, and glue, I have all used.
GG
 

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I worked for a company that had a small mill and I can attest that once white pine turns to punk it's worthless.
If you value your time and labor,the cost of fresh logs is negligible.
 
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