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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

I am leaning towards starting with Apimaye but may try out wood alongside it.

Does anyone know of a wood hive that doesn’t use plywood in its construction and instead uses solid wood / boards especially for the inner cover?

Any help or leads appreciated!
 

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Hey everyone,

I am leaning towards starting with Apimaye but may try out wood alongside it.

Does anyone know of a wood hive that doesn’t use plywood in its construction and instead uses solid wood / boards especially for the inner cover?

Any help or leads appreciated!
Pretty much all of them. For deep you start with a 1x12 and the rest is simple woodworking. Or if you buy from just about any distributor they are made of pine, cypress, or whatever and come either assembled or flat-packed that you glue/nail/screw together yourself. I must be misunderstanding the question though.
 

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Hey everyone,

I am leaning towards starting with Apimaye but may try out wood alongside it.

Does anyone know of a wood hive that doesn’t use plywood in its construction and instead uses solid wood / boards especially for the inner cover?

Any help or leads appreciated!
I have both, wood and Apimaye, side by side - the wooden hives from Dadant are solid wood although the inner cover is fiber board
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks - to clarify I am trying to find a hive if it exists that doesn’t use plywood or some type of “manufactured” wood for the inner cover especially (or anywhere else). Curious if any use real boards / solid wood that I am missing.
 

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Just wanted to say that plywood is quite desirable for one-piece inner covers (we call 'em Crown Boards) as plywood is much more dimensionally stable than solid wood, which has a tendency to 'cup' - unless you can source some well-seasoned lumber which has been sawn appropriately.
I now use a synthetic sheet material called 'Foamex' (a strange choice of name, 'cause it ain't foam), which is proving to be absolutely perfect for the job.
LJ
 

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I am reading between the lines, but if you are reluctant to use plywood because of possible risks due to adhesives, formaldehyde, etc., you can rest easy. As has been said, the boxes are typically solid wood, usually pine and the inner cover is masonite. Masonite is formed by steam and high pressure...no adhesive.
 

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I would ask what is the reason for not wanting to use plywood for the inner cover?

I make hives and the inner cover is plywood with a white pine rim. The outer cover is plywood with a white pine rim and covered with aluminum flashing. Bottom boards have a plywood bottom, but the front edge is yellow pine and the rim is white pine.
 

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Why would you want to use an Apimaye hive and not a wood hive with plywood or some other composit only in the inner cover, just use a migratory cover and do away with the Apimaye and the inner cover, Quite frankly the Apimaye hives are overpricd and over rated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone, @Fivej you got it - thanks for the tip on Masonite, did not realize that! That helps a lot.

@johno honestly, really leaning Apimaye but may throw in a wood hive or two for comparison. For the Apimaye the built-in insulation is a big plus along with the fact that it seems to be a tightly integrated system, all included, and even just everything latching together is great. Pricing things out I am not really finding it to be much more expensive and sometimes it’s even right about the same compared to (some) wood hives after you add things like the queen excluder, mouse guard, feeder, pollen trap, hive wrap, paint, etc….and fitting the theme of this thread possibly having to replace the inner cover. :)
 

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Thanks everyone, @Fivej you got it - thanks for the tip on Masonite, did not realize that! That helps a lot.

@johno honestly, really leaning Apimaye but may throw in a wood hive or two for comparison. For the Apimaye the built-in insulation is a big plus along with the fact that it seems to be a tightly integrated system, all included, and even just everything latching together is great. Pricing things out I am not really finding it to be much more expensive and sometimes it’s even right about the same compared to (some) wood hives after you add things like the queen excluder, mouse guard, feeder, pollen trap, hive wrap, paint, etc….and fitting the theme of this thread possibly having to replace the inner cover. :)
Re Apimaye - I agree that the price difference to traditional wood is minor after you add "accessories" to a basic hive. I was buying wood hives, then I added up how much I spent on the latest hive (SCR BB, feeder, QE, moisture box etc.). The total came out real close to Apimaye and, IMHO, Apimaye is a "more complete" unit. Insulation is nice, maintenance free and the clasps are great if you have to handle a boxes. I like 'em a lot
 

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I have 2 Apimaye hives and am not too impressed, what ever you do, do not use their plastic frames or you may be sorry for the mess. Besides I built my own wooden hives so the price could not compare, wait till you get to where you are going to need more medium supers and end looking at $90 for a box you must be kidding me with a price like that. Good luck with that.
 

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I have an old commercial hive from the central Valley in California. They used 3 pieces of wood (1 x 8 ?) for the bottom board and same for the top migratory cover. Pretty darn heavy and I don't use it. It came with 2 deeps with aluminum foundation in the frames. I looked them up and they were made in California in the 1920's.

I'm pretty sure you will have a hard time finding these but you can build them easily enough if you have a wood shop. There's a reason that plywood is used.
 

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I don’t use an inner cover is that weird?
Do you use anything such as a cloth? I wouldn't say it's weird, but it's unconventional. The convention is because if the telescoping outer cover gets propolized, it's a b#*ch to get off. If you use migratory covers, it's not as hard to break free.
Many are using muslin cloth or bubble wrap instead of the standard cover and many like it. J
 

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The only problem I find with the cloth or plastic cover is that they create hiding places above the bars for beetles where the bees cant get to them, so I staple 3/16" strips around my covers so that there is normal bee space above the frames..
 

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Thanks - to clarify I am trying to find a hive if it exists that doesn’t use plywood or some type of “manufactured” wood for the inner cover especially (or anywhere else). Curious if any use real boards / solid wood that I am missing.
The thickness and width would make using dimension lumber unfeasable. If you are speaking of the outer frame of the inner cover, that can be constructed of anything in my case usually scraps. Keep in mind the inner cover does not get weather exposure resting beneath the outer cover. I hope I understood your question. I priced 10 frame inner covers recently. $18!!! Most of mine are built of scrap luan plywood and trimmed pieces from dimension lumber.
 

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It is possible to make everything in a hive out of lumber but plywood just goes faster and is more stable.
I do make some inner covers and tops out of thin lumber at times. Mostly if I have trim cuts from bringing a cant on the mill to size for regular lumber. I guess you could use tounge and groove pine bead board from Lowe’s or some such place.
 

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Do you use anything such as a cloth? I wouldn't say it's weird, but it's unconventional. The convention is because if the telescoping outer cover gets propolized, it's a b#*ch to get off. If you use migratory covers, it's not as hard to break free.
Many are using muslin cloth or bubble wrap instead of the standard cover and many like it. J
I learned a little trick for inner and outer covers, and even frame rests. A swab of Vaseline eliminates the sticking. You don't have to do it every time, but it dissuaded the bees from pro policing those surfaces effectively. That Vaseline doesn't harm the bees.
 

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I learned a little trick for inner and outer covers, and even frame rests. A swab of Vaseline eliminates the sticking. You don't have to do it every time, but it dissuaded the bees from pro policing those surfaces effectively. That Vaseline doesn't harm the bees.
Yes on the vaseline; I use soft inner covers of reflectix bubble wrap but really like the vaseline for frame rest areas of hive bodies.
My spring house cleaning involves scraping frames down and placing them into another hive body that has the frame rests given the vaseline treatment. I run the flame from my propane torch down the frame rest area of the removed box and a quick scrape with the hive tool cleans off the old wax and propolis. Much easier on me and the box than trying to remove it cold. Hot air gun good tool too but my propane torch is standard equipment for lighting smoker without having to empty it. This time of year it sits handy to my woodstove for lighting off the kindling.
 
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