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If you can trust yourself to never turn a frame on its flat you might consider it! The bees often dont attach the comb to either end bars or bottom bars at least in the brood nest and comb is amazingly tender. After a couple of months the comb gets attached more and the comb toughens up with a couple of brood cycles. If you want to be able to cut cells for queen rearing consider stringing the frame with heavy monofilament fishing line instead of wire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you can trust yourself to never turn a frame on its flat you might consider it! The bees often dont attach the comb to either end bars or bottom bars at least in the brood nest and comb is amazingly tender. After a couple of months the comb gets attached more and the comb toughens up with a couple of brood cycles. If you want to be able to cut cells for queen rearing consider stringing the frame with heavy monofilament fishing line instead of wire.

Gotcha. So essentially the same requirements as a traditional TBH especially when full of honey. I saw lot of people going with mediums and I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing some major danger of some sort aside from the above. You string with monofilament between end bars or do you go around them like you would with rubber bands for a cutout?

Thanks!
 

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If you are going to take the time to use fishing line, why not just wire them? I do not think it takes that much time, but I guess it depends on how quick you are:scratch:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you are going to take the time to use fishing line, why not just wire them? I do not think it takes that much time, but I guess it depends on how quick you are:scratch:

Not planning on doing either one but the fishing line was something I hadn't seen before. Just curious how it was done. =)
 

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If you want to cut out or set in a queen cell the monofilament might be easier. Myself, I find wire easier to work with, anchor and tie off, than the slippery mono. Small nippers will get rid of wire quickly it if it is in the way.
 

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What I do is to thread the mono through 2 holes each side, knot the ends together on the outside of the end bar, pull tight (the knot will slip) and dab the knot with Titebond to stabilize it. Takes only a few seconds, and you can get them banjo tight with little effort.

I'm no expert, but the line seems better than wire for foundationless to me, because the heavy mono has a much larger diameter and is less likely to cut the fresh comb, if you make a mistake and turn the comb the wrong way.
 

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I have made them both ways and have gone back to using wire. The only benefit to the fishing line is if you want to cut strips of comb for queen rearing.
 

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If you use wire the Mann Lake wire crimper really works slick to tighten the wire and the crimps give the comb a much better grip on the wire.



Frame Wire Crimper - Give your foundation the support it needs. Crimp and tighten your frame wire prior to embedding.
HD-144 Frame Wire Crimper $ 4.95

Saw a tip on another forum, that a set of food tongs is a good aid when retrieving broken comb from down amongst the frames; the bees "hate when that happens", :D
 

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If you don't writer them and store them for any time you will have more problems with them. Warp and so on.
 
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