Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was told hives in the north where winters are very cold, winter much better with 2 deeps and a med honey super. Do you think 2 deeps is plenty up north where bees are clusterd for about 6 months or would the extra honey super be better. Any in put would be great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
I live in th PNW it rains alot having that extra super with honey and sugar syrup on helps out a lot. I just keep my queen excluder on to keep from brood happing in the super. the more food the happier they will bee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,532 Posts
2 deeps are enough if managed properly. Some beeks use 3 deeps. DO NOT leave queen excluder on during the winter months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
I agree no queen excluder, 2 deeps a min in northern WI.
If not using any kind of wrap or insulation, extra super is likely needed.
Bees should be worked to the top by this time of the year, excluder could
cause problems with the cluster and start of brood rearing.
Cold spell after brood rearing starts would be deadly, cause they don't want to
abandon the brood. JMO

BM

+03F OUTSIDE +58.2F INSIDE TOP COVER
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Just looking for information. Does the variety of bee make a difference in the Far North of U.S. for determining number of supers? For example, would Buckfast Bee do better in colder temp or do they burn too much fuel to keep warm there i.e. need more supers to make it?

We have three and four deep supers to help with spring start up as well as using foil/plastic bubble/foil insulation (from Lowes) to keep the wind and wind chill off the sides of the hives.

Just asking. In Kentucky, just outside Lexington, everyone has Italians which rob everyone even their own. Buckfasts appear to do better, especially the disease mite resistance.

Any info up there?

thank you in advance for sharing....just trying to learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,683 Posts
I winter in Manitoba. Different beeks winter differently. Some winter indoors in singles or doubles, others winter outdoors in singles or doubles. The trick is to get enough feed on them before temps drop to much so they can store and cap the syrup. We aim for 5-7 gallons of syrup fed in September and unwrapped May 10, with feed on hopefully in March, weather dependant

We winter outdoors
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I keep the buckfast variety here in northern ontario, I use two deep supers and i feed in late november and late march, they do quite well, I can say that for the russians, they have small cluster and i don't think the two i started will survive, i also insulate with 2" sm with vent holes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
Just to be crystal clear, the reason you DO NOT use an excluder for overwintering is that as the cluster moves up into honey stores, the excluder will keep the queen down..and perhaps prevent the cluster from moving up into stores. Then they starve. Some early brood in that honey super is a small price to pay for colony survival.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,597 Posts
We winter in singles in the frigid long winters of the Fingerlakes region of upstate NY. Our bees do quite well. We have used 2 and three deep configurations and we do better in well stocked singles. Richard Taylor (shook swarm and comb honey author) was the one who got us started.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top