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We may have just passed our syrup feeding deadline here in the white high Desert. Highs are going to be below freezing with snow and cold for several days forecast. That will put us within a week of normal too cold to feed time. I am glad that my feeding was about done anyway. The ones not heavy enough now were lost causes that I should have already culled anyway. Wrapping is left to accomplish but that is not time sensitive. I sometimes think that an insulated wraps major function is giving the bees a more controllable environment in which to start ramping up spring brooding. We had a great summer and fall with more than adequate moisture and the bees are in better shape going into winter than at least the last two or three years.
 

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6a high desert- I'm not in a rush to wrap unless we get a Canadian storm. (Which we did last year) Since we should be done with mite treatments and feeding it's just a waiting game until we put them to bed. I'm watching the weather carefully and especially wind. Wraps serve best as a wind break. I'll also fit pallets in behind the hives for a break too. I'm busy with the fall garden, getting bulbs in the ground and prepping for fall direct sowing of wildflowers (larkspur, lupine, oxeye daisy, poppies, phacelia, maybe some snaps as an experiment)
 

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Vance G "I sometimes think that an insulated wraps major function is giving the bees a more controllable environment in which to start ramping up spring brooding. "

It is a major benefit from what I have seen here. I also finding, as I go with insualtion all year, that developing winter brood is more successful as my colonies definitely seem bigger and stronger and more of them. I also have experienced zero winter losses two years in a row except for a drone laying worker hive that got out-of-hand and let it go. After my first year-round insulation stint, capping seems much better and the first batch for bottling tested surprisingly low moisture. I will be refractometer testing a lot more buckets. Finally, I have had very little swarming. Just one with an average of ten hives in two years - really strange so it seems. I have been monitoring temperatures and some relative humidity values for 9 months.

I am continuing on with my plan with additional temeprature sesnors and humidity sensors. My goal is to measure 8 ot 10 hives for a complete cycle with insulation coverage improved for the summer time iwth supers on. If I find an adverse event I'll post it.
 

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I went thru my scientist phase some years ago. I just find it too much work and my system works as well as I work to make it happen. IF money was no object I would really love the high quality Beaver Plastics boxes made up Calgary way in Canada but as my clock winds down that is not going to happen. In northern Europe, insulated hives are now standard I understand.
 

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6a high desert- I'm not in a rush to wrap unless we get a Canadian storm. (Which we did last year) Since we should be done with mite treatments and feeding it's just a waiting game until we put them to bed. I'm watching the weather carefully and especially wind. Wraps serve best as a wind break. I'll also fit pallets in behind the hives for a break too. I'm busy with the fall garden, getting bulbs in the ground and prepping for fall direct sowing of wildflowers (larkspur, lupine, oxeye daisy, poppies, phacelia, maybe some snaps as an experiment)
We have our Canadian storm six inches deep on the ground and the furnace is running!
 

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Fair exchange for all the leftovers from the American Hurricanes messing up the weather in our eastern provinces.;)
 

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What Hurricanes? I never noticed a thing! Still snowing like it is serious! Moisture is always welcome here if you have any sense.
 

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You're getting a lot more snow than we are here in Southern Montana. We got a dusting and today has been freezing rain. 21 f this morning. Feeding shims, sugar, insulation, wraps and reduced entrances are on my to-do list this week, looks like we may drift off into winter here soon.

Lee
 

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Vance G "I sometimes think that an insulated wraps major function is giving the bees a more controllable environment in which to start ramping up spring brooding. "

It is a major benefit from what I have seen here. I also finding, as I go with insualtion all year, that developing winter brood is more successful as my colonies definitely seem bigger and stronger and more of them. I also have experienced zero winter losses two years in a row except for a drone laying worker hive that got out-of-hand and let it go. After my first year-round insulation stint, capping seems much better and the first batch for bottling tested surprisingly low moisture. I will be refractometer testing a lot more buckets. Finally, I have had very little swarming. Just one with an average of ten hives in two years - really strange so it seems. I have been monitoring temperatures and some relative humidity values for 9 months.

I am continuing on with my plan with additional temeprature sesnors and humidity sensors. My goal is to measure 8 ot 10 hives for a complete cycle with insulation coverage improved for the summer time iwth supers on. If I find an adverse event I'll post it.
That is the way I think I will go. I am a first year beekeeper in the north and I have wrapped and insulated my hives already. In zone 2a my next hive will be double walled so I don't have to keep the styrofoam sheets in storage and put them back on every fall.
 
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