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First winter for me as a beek.


I was thinking of weighting the boxes using one of those big game scales I use to weigh deer.

In reading my books, I don’t see a lot about what to do in the winter. I know I don’t want to disturb the bees unless it is warmer (say above 50)– but should I check on them in Jan or Feb to ensure they have enough honey to survive the winter?
 

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Sure, you can check at any time but you don't NEED a scale. You can just give a pull and see if they feel "heavy". I suppose you could weigh once and then use that as a baseline (weigh...then heft and remember how heavy it felt). As long as you're not pulling things apart, check as often as you like. You learn a lot in the first year or so!
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>If they can't produce enough to survive, then they should be dead.

Assuming you never harvested or did splits this might make sense. but since I steal their honey, and also do splits not having enough could easily be my fault and not theirs and not having enough bees may also be my fault and not theirs.
 

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>If they can't produce enough to survive, then they should be dead.

Or if the weather doesn't cooperate and their stores are low? Is your advice to never feed despite the reason and let them die?

Seems a bit cruel, not to mention wasteful and expensive and irresponsibe to me. How much success have you had using this method over the years?

Wayne
 

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Bad Advice / Good Advice

Nature will take care of themselves. If they can't produce enough to survive, then they should be dead.
WOW! :scratch:

Well, now you know why you hear the warning about believing everything you hear on the internet!!

Sorry to say, but this statement rates as the WORST advice ever!

"I don't treat" rates a close second.

If the wind blows a hive over do we ignore this as well?

I chock all of this excusizm to lazyness.

Are you a beekeeper or not?

New beekeepers; please attend your local beeschool, find a mentor and become sucsessful in beekeeping! DON'T BELIEVE EVERY THING YOU READ OR HEAR!

Read and evaluate and then make your own informed decision.
:)
 

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There are two kinds of folks that keep honeybees.

Beekeepers: Someone that learns about their bees, manages them and is a good Shepard. They enjoy healthy honeybees and bountiful honey crops.

Beehavers: Someone that buys a hive of honeybees than dose nothing to manage them or learn about being a good Shepard. Than wonders why their bees always die and they never get any honey.
 

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Re: Bad Advice / Good Advice

WOW! :scratch:

Well, now you know why you hear the warning about believing everything you hear on the internet!!

Sorry to say, but this statement rates as the WORST advice ever!

"I don't treat" rates a close second.

...
New beekeepers; please attend your local beeschool, find a mentor and become sucsessful in beekeeping! DON'T BELIEVE EVERY THING YOU READ OR HEAR!

Read and evaluate and then make your own informed decision.
:)
The best advice in this quote is the last, to attend bee school, find a mentor, and don't believe everything you read or hear. "I don't treat" is painful at first... but look where treating has gotten us. Resistant mites and weak bees. From what I'm reading here, more and more beeks are getting off the chemical bandwagon, and finding success. To each his/her own I guess. Take it with a grain of salt. :lookout:
Regards,
Steven
 
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