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I have a hive that I removed the queen from when I saw swarm cells 5 weeks ago. hive requeened itself without swarming and this queen started laying a week or so ago. Now swarm cells with brood are back. (About 8 on two frames). I removed this new queen and started a small nuc.
My plan: plan A: when swarm cells capped I will remove a frame with a couple on it and put into the above nuc and reintroduce queen back in. Then destroy rest of swarm cells
Or plan B: destroy all swarm cells then reintroduce queen in a week or so by recombining
Plan C: let them requeen themselves AGAIN. can they tolerate that?

Suggestions/opinions welcome
My goal: keep hive from swarming and maximize honey.

Thanks
 

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It is very difficult to prevent a swarm once the bees decide to swarm, removing the queen and starting another hive with her once the swarm cells are started most frequently does not work, as they will then swarm with a virgin. And probably after swarms. At this point several splits may be your best option. You will be out honey production, but may keep your bees.
 

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Start a nuc with the old queen and make sure you shake A LOT of nurse bees in to the new nuc when you do it... When I first started keeping bees I would just pull 5 frames from the hive to start the nuc and had the same issue you are with them wanting to swarm again but once I started shaking nurse bees in to nuc I stopped having that issue.
 

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If you follow plan b) you might get some good honey off the end of the spring flow. If you remove the queen to a nuc and follow plan c) you might be able to establish a new hive and get honey out of the original colony.
 

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removing the queen and starting another hive with her once the swarm cells are started most frequently does not work, as they will then swarm with a virgin
It is interesting how we often have such different experiences. Removing the mother queen from a hive making swarm preparations has been one of my most effective swarm management tools. I take one other step. I remove all but two or three swarm cells. I try to be sure that those cells are the same age. Usually, I pick several that are adjacent to one another....as I'm assuming they were started at the same time. When the new queens emerge and one prevails....there's no mother queen to leave with a swarm and no later queens coming along to produce an after swarm. After that....I make sure they have plenty of space.....and they boom on along.
 

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The only thing that makes sense to me is if the bees have decided to swarm do it for them so you know where they will go.
 
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