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Man, oh man did I have high hopes for my booming hive . . . ugh! I am in the suburbs of Chicago, and yesterday my hive swarmed. I caught the swarm, so it's not all bad. I was just going to let the old hive requeen naturally, but got to thinking "holy &*&$, I haven't seen any drones yet this year". Can someone give me advice? Buy a queen and just introduce, hoping she kills the queen cells? Let the hive be as I'd like to get some local genetics? Tear through the hive looking for queen cells and requeen?? Thanks for the advice.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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Man, oh man did I have high hopes for my booming hive . . . ugh! I am in the suburbs of Chicago, and yesterday my hive swarmed. I caught the swarm, so it's not all bad. I was just going to let the old hive requeen naturally, but got to thinking "holy &*&$, I haven't seen any drones yet this year". Can someone give me advice? Buy a queen and just introduce, hoping she kills the queen cells? Let the hive be as I'd like to get sHell some local genetics? Tear through the hive looking for queen cells and requeen?? Thanks for the advice.
I am 3 hours drive North of you , I have drones, should be Ok there to mate.

I would go in just in case there are 10 queen cells you may see a swarm or 2 more, As well if lots of good size cells one could split the hive if increase is something you want. Don't just cut them all out, leave the biggest 3 if hive is packed addsome space.

They almost never swarm with out several queen cells in the parent hive. If they have cells they are likely to kill the new queen, IF you go that route you need to remove all the cells and all the Virgins :) may be a challenge.

If they boomed and survived the winter the genetics are likely Ok

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am 3 hours drive North of you , I have drones, should be Ok there to mate.

I would go in just in case there are 10 queen cells you may see a swarm or 2 more, As well if lots of good size cells one could split the hive if increase is something you want. Don't just cut them all out, leave the biggest 3 if hive is packed addsome space.

They almost never swarm with out several queen cells in the parent hive. If they have cells they are likely to kill the new queen, IF you go that route you need to remove all the cells and all the Virgins :) may be a challenge.

If they boomed and survived the winter the genetics are likely Ok

GG
Thanks for the advice! Truly appreciated. I'll go in this afternoon and look to cut out a bunch of queen cells, leaving a couple of the largest.
 

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The bees will generally take care of this and even if you don't see many drones with your own colonies, there is very likely a "mating" location within 5 miles of your location for the new queen to do the deed...
 
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