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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A month ago, I moved an 18 month old queen that wasn't laying well from a hive into a nuc so I could add a new queen to the hive. T
here were no issues. Saturday, I finally decided to re-queen the nuc with a brand new mated queen. I caught the old queen and moved her into a cage for insurance, waited 26 hours and tried to add the new queen to the nuc. They immediately attacked the cage trying to bite her so I pulled it out and decided to wait another 24 hours. Just tried adding her again and the exact same scenario. This time they actually killed one of the caged attendants.

After thoroughly checking the nuc again for a daughter queen or cells, nothing is there to make them think they are queen right but they certainly will not allow this queen into the nuc. There are still a few eggs and lots of larva and brood from the previous queen. I tried smoking them to no avail. Any ideas?
Thanks,

John
 

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I know beekeepers who have had luck introducing queens by first spraying down the frames with a 1:1 syrup solution + vanilla.

Outside of that, put her in with the corks in place for a few days, so they can't release her, then re-check and see how they like her. If they are better towards her, remove the cork on the candy end and let them proceed as usual.

You can also try something like this:

http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Requeening-Frame/productinfo/274/

I made one myself, and it works pretty well, but it takes a long time before you release her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good idea but Brushy won't have it here in time for this queen to make it. I'd leave the corks in but they killed one of the attendants in less than 2 minutes when I tried to install her today. Very strange...
 

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With that kind of aggression sure sounds like they consider themselves queen right. There could be a virgin queen afoot. They can be hard to spot. Leave them queenless, for three days and check for eggs on day four.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just a follow up. I went into the nuc yesterday and there 8 populated queen cells, 2 capped. Just for grins I let them near the new queen I had tried to install and the aggressive behavior immediately came back. When I put the cage with their old queen in it, they immediately started caring for her.

I took some of the cells and put them in a queen castle in case someone from our club needs a local queen, put the old queen back in the nuc and will make another nuc from a different yard for the new queen and start feeding it immediately.
–John
 
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