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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I installed a nuc about a month ago. As instructed by the beek I got it from, I put the nuc and additional frames, to total 8 frames in the lower deep. When they were built up, I added a second deep with all 10 frames to my hive.

My lower deep, with only 8 frames, has wild comb since there is so much space between frames. I was told that I should remove the wild comb to avoid problems.

I hate to remove what they have built, because I don't want to destroy any eggs or larva. They need to build numbers, right?

Would I be better off leaving them to their own devices through the winter and removing the wild comb next spring when they are strong, refreshed, and ready to get back to work? Or, should I remove it before fall, so they have enough time to re-build?

If I remove the wild comb, I would tear down one full frame - the others look pretty good.
 

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I would just clean up the small pieces so it doesnt get way out of hand and leave the rest for the bees to use as a bridge to have easier travel! If you cleaned it all up they would rebuild it back anyways! Plus if its a 10 frame box you need 10 frames tight up against each other in the box....or Your gonna have a big mess when they draw out the frames!
 

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Don't know what kind of beek told you to put 8 frames in a 10 frame box, but I wouldn't listen to any more of his nonsense! Clean the mess up now, not later. Take out the 8 frames and put them in another box along with 2 others. Clean out the wild combs. Reuse the box. Depending on how they built out the one bad frame you may have to put new foundation in it as they usually try to continue with whatever they've built.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No, he knew I had 10 frame boxes. He said to give them some space to start working on the new frames and the extra space will give me a better chance not to roll the queen. The nuc was a 5 frame nuc with 4 frames in it, so they had already started working on some funky comb when I got them.

This guy has had bees for LONG time. Nice small business for his honey. Different strokes, I guess.

I'm gonna let the queen move upstairs to the second deep and then remove the comb - get things nice & tight.

Thanks for everyone's help!
 

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My mentor told me to do the same but with nine frames. I know nine frames is common in the supers using drawn comb. I did not know at that time that if using foundation you need to stay with ten frames so the bee space isn't to wide allowing them to wildly place bur comb. What's worse is I did this in the brood chamber when I started out. Originally, I bought the hive with 6 frames and a frame feeder. As they grew I was suppose to add a second deep, move the feeder up and replace it with foundation. It was when I added that foundation that I went to nine frame spacing. So mainly the three frames of foundation I added are a mess while the original brood frames are still ok. I now have foundation at all stages from my second and third deep. I wised up a bit with these and kept the spacing of ten frames so I would have properly sized comb to replace the wild ones below.

I have also read on the forum, you can go in and scrap it all out and then place it back for the bees to fix. And of course at the same time you would need to add two more frames of foundation or comb if you have it to have them properly spaced.

Also, I know it is common practice to use deeps for brood chambers and mediums for supers. The reason I added a third deep for a super is so I would have extra capped honey to feed back in the winter if needed or to have the drawn combs incase I want to make splits next year.

I hope this help some....:p:s?

Keep us posted on how you handle it 'cause I'm curious what methods work the best to fix this apparently common first mistake.

Thanks and good luck, John
 

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I'm gonna let the queen move upstairs to the second deep and then remove the comb - get things nice & tight.

What do you intend to accomplish by waiting on the queen to move up into the second box? What benefit will you gain by doing it this way? I'm not aware of any.

The longer you wait, (for ANY reason) the WORSE it will get. Well experienced beekeepers have made it clear that the wisest thing to do is to fix it now, and correct your beespace violations so you don't continue to have these problems.

Ignore good advice at your own peril.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm not one to pass up good advice! My approach came from NatureBoy in response #2 on this thread. I figure if I wait until the brood was out of that frame, I would get the benefit of the fresh bees and still have time to clear out the comb, since the queen would be working in the second deep.

I take it you don't think that is a good approach, CountryBoy.

Sorry, Man. No disrespect. Lots of advice, have to decide on one way to proceed.
 

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Lesson one: Bee Space. Any space smaller than 3/8" bees will fill with propolis. Any space larger than 3/8" bees will fill with comb. The 3/8 is approximate but close. There are a few (very few) exceptions to this rule. Here endth the lesson! :D

Personally I would not wait, I would clean it up now even if it means loss of a bit of brood. JMO
 

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when culling burr comb, remember that the bees have very little investment in eggs, a little more in young brood...by the time it's capped, they have finished feeding the brood and only need to regulate the temperature.

it's much better to cull the comb when it is just eggs...if you wait, you are either going to have to wait until there is no brood in the comb (at which point it may be too late in the season for them to draw out new comb properly (and it may be filled with honey/nectar).

"'twere best done quickly"

deknow
 

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I'm not one to pass up good advice! My approach came from NatureBoy in response #2 on this thread.

27 posts total. Consider the source.

I figure if I wait until the brood was out of that frame, I would get the benefit of the fresh bees and still have time to clear out the comb, since the queen would be working in the second deep.

It has been my experience that the queen will be laying new eggs in a frame before all the brood has emerged on that frame. Good queens will fill both brood boxes, and I don't see completely empty frames. (either frames with brood or honey)
 

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Hey Presidential... I was just currious if you got a chance to try and fix things up this weekend? Please keep us posted...:)

Thanks, John
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I will inspect the bees tomorrow and organize my hive. I have the new frames ready to make everything right & tight. Weather is keeping me out last night & today.

I am interested in getting my hands on the wild comb and looking it over. AMAZING! I'm sure I'll have questions - - I do everytime I open the hive. I read a lot... but, I'm looking forward to taking a class - seeing it and hearing it from an experienced beek.

You know, I've never even seen a hive, except for the one I built just over a month ago! Never talked to anybody who actually has one, either. So, I really appreciate all your help!!

We joined a local beek association - so, maybe we can meet some folks that will let us look over their shoulder.
 
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