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Hello Everyone,
I may have an interesting situation on my hands soon that could lead to me getting some more bees! I've been asked to come out to remove a beehive from near someones house. They're pretty sure that they are honeybees, but I'll make sure once I get there. My question is how would I go about transferring them from this hive into my langstroth hive that I'd like to keep them in? I believe the hive is near ground level, but I don't know what it looks like yet, I'm going to try to get them to send me a picture soon and maybe I'll post that on here. If it's an entire typical looking hive should I just pick that up and put it in a box and bring it to where I want it, or should I split it open and shake the bees into a little transportable nuc and then transfer them? I've got a feeling they're going to be angry with me at first and not quite as docile as the swarms I've captured before haha.
 

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Search this forum under thee terms "cut out" and "trap out". You'll find discussions on what to do and what supplies you'll need. In general transferring a feral hive to a lang requires cutting comb and attaching it to foundationless frames with rubber bands in a methodical process. I would also recommend you look up JPthebeeman on Youtube to watch the process. Each feral hive capture is unique, I've done them under s shed, an inground water meter, eaves of roofs, etc. Good Luck
 

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I just did my first cut out about a week ago. I learned a lot by watching Youtube videos and reading posts here.

Basically you will need at least two hive bodies with foundationless frames, rubberbands, a serrated knife to cut comb, a helper and any carpenter tools you might need to open the cavity.
I fortunately had an impromptu bee-vac, in that my shop vac has a variable speed and I still closed off part of the intake to lower the suction.

Open the cavity, look for the queen(good Luck) and cut the comb to fit into your frames. Secure with rubber bands (Already having at least 3 bands on the frames helps down the road)

I then set the box with the comb and as many bees as I could close to the bee's original entry point and left it there till dark. I then went and picked it up(after suctioning the remaining bees), secured it, closed off the entrance with some hardware cloth and moved it to my yard. I kept the hardware cloth in the entrance for the next day, then opened it up (Bee careful, they were angry!)

I had my smoker ready but never had to use it. Work slow and methodically. The only time I was stung was when I crushed one (My fault)

I'm sure this is over simplification and a more experienced beek can add lots more, but it worked for me. My wife and I actually had fun for 3 1/2 hours!

Good luck!

Dave
 

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JPthebeeman rocks. Totally agree that every cutout is unique. And it can take a range of tools and techniques to tackle each job. The biggest thing I'd advise is to charge to do this work. These are not "free bees". It will take you time and likely some money spent to transfer the hive. Also, depending on the situation the colony might not make it after the transfer attempt.

The easiest cutouts I do take 4 hours minimum. I also have a contract written up so they understand what I am and am not obligated to do as part of the job. Just think it through before jumping in there.
 
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