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I'm not a big honey eater. I eat maybe a pint a year, well, no more than a quart per year for sure. I keep bees because of my fascination of the behavioral and social structures in a hive. The Biology of the hive workings. The inside of a hive is just so very intriguing and interesting to me. When I pop a lid, the whole rest of the world fades away and a calm peace comes over me with no worries at all. The hive has my very full attention, the sight, the smells, the sounds, the activities. Still wonderful to behold even after all these years.
 

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I got my first hives when I was about 7, had no idea of what to do or how to care for them.
After getting stung a few times I was about to call it quits until one day I pulled out a frame of white capped honey and ran my finger through it. After licking all of that up I can tell you I was hooked. I have a giant sweet tooth and man o man I knew I had hit the jack pot. Lot easier back then but everything changes. Eating honey by the spoonful is just too good!

Them little bugs are just too fascinating to quit watching. I can sit down with a frame of brood or honey and just watch for an hour or so. Amazes me how every bee seems to know what is going on and just does what ever needs to be done. See the queen checking out cells and laying eggs, new bees hatching out, making bee bread, waggle dance, coming in heavy with pollen baskets full, that one guard bee that just has to check out everybody, comb building, seeing a queen come back from a mating flight, putting drones in your pocket and going to visit a friend, on and on just too much.

I can honestly say that this is the one thing that has held my interest the longest, and they still teach me something all the time.
 

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every bee seems to know what is going on and just does what ever needs to be done

This reminds me of Joe Faulk Auto parts in a small little shop in downtown Bryan Texas. When we we're kids,and the car broke down, we would walk down there with our dad and he would tell the guy behind the counter, that had a cigarette in his lips with along ash on it, what was going on. He would flip open a book about three foot thick,mounted in some kind of metal keeper system, turn to the right page, look at a number, go get apart form a dark rack that nobody else was allowed to see, and that part fixed it right the first time, every time. If there was ever a rare instance that the guy didn't know or had a question, he would go ask Joe and Joe knew every part and everything on every car ever made and everything that was needed. Joe was never wrong. We never left with the wrong part or a part that wasn't needed. There was never a time where we had to take something back.

Today, the manger doens't know and has to ask the little guy who does know. The roles of everything has changed so much.
 

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o_O

"Who would want a world without honey, flowers, and third of everything we eat including chocolate and coffee? Not me.
Some 250,000 species of flowering plants depend on bees for pollination. Many of these are crucial to world agriculture. Bees increase the yields of around 90 crops, such as apples, blueberries and cucumbers by up to 30%, so many fruits and vegetables would become scarce and prohibitively expensive.
In addition, many of our medicines, both conventional and alternative remedies, come from flowering plants. And cotton is another essential product pollinated by the bee, so we could say goodbye to cheap T-shirts and jeans.
But it's not just the human race that would suffer. Spare a thought for the poor birds and small mammals that feed off the berries and seeds that rely on bee pollination. They would die of hunger and in turn their predators – the omnivores or carnivores that continue the food chain would also starve. We could survive on wind-pollinated grains and fish, but there would be wars for control of dwindling food supplies. South America's ancient Mayan civilisation is thought to have died of starvation.
Although other insects and animals do pollinate – such as bats, butterflies and even wasps – none is designed like the bee as a pollinator machine.
There are 20,000 bee species around the world including solitary bees, bumblebees and honeybees. Many are monoletic – pollinate one plant – others like bumblebees and honeybees are polylectic. While bumblebees live in colonies of a few hundred, the sheer number of honeybees in a hive – up to 50,000 in the summer - and their ability to be managed, manipulated and transported by man makes them the most valuable pollinator.
Unfortunately all bees are already under serious Industrialised farming with its monocultures and pesticides has destroyed biodiversity and robbed the majority of bees of their habitat and food. While across the globe, the western honeybee – bred for its gentle nature and prolific honey making and pollination – is plagued by parasites and viruses, and also jeopardised by modern agricultural practices. More than a third of honeybees were wiped out in the US by Colony Collapse Disorder, a mysterious disease which is thought to be a combination of these assailants.
As Dr George McGavin, has said: "Bee populations are in freefall. A world without bees would be totally catastrophic"."

:)

Adapted from the Guardian, 11/21/08.
 

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I love honey and eat it everyday so I figured I may as well make my own. Plus, I like knowing the source and enjoy being outdoors. Honestly, though, If I didn't eat a lot of honey, I probably wouldn't have bees. They are a lot of work.

Side bonus is that I can identify ALOT more trees, shrubs, and wildflowers than I used too. A lot more.
 

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I'm not a big honey eater. I eat maybe a pint a year, well, no more than a quart per year for sure. I keep bees because of my fascination of the behavioral and social structures in a hive. The Biology of the hive workings. The inside of a hive is just so very intriguing and interesting to me. When I pop a lid, the whole rest of the world fades away and a calm peace comes over me with no worries at all. The hive has my very full attention, the sight, the smells, the sounds, the activities. Still wonderful to behold even after all these years.
My reasons are similiar and also how different each hive can be. Like how the Queen reacts to the seasons and some bees tend to washboard more than others and just on and on. But then about the honey. If you get a bunch of honey and put it on a slice of bread. Let it sit for a couple of minutes, then peanut butter the other half? irresisitable! :)
 

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I mix the peanut butter and honey together in a coffee cup with a butter knife and spread it lavishly on toast, bread, crackers, hey on graham crackers too, and corn bread...
 

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I do not like honey. I am a closet introvert that made the mistake of going to law school and entering a profession that only values extrovert qualities. I have adapted and adjusted and created an extrovert persona that I put on weekly but I am exhausted by it.

But on Saturday and Sunday morning, I wake up at 6:00 am, get in my truck and go to my bee yards and come back at dark, usually having never spoken to another soul all day. It recharges me and I live to do it every weekend.
 

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I believe that as I age I need to constantly learn new things, things that take time, effort and study in order to exercise my brain. Beekeeping is my new adventure in learning, and, as I am quickly finding out, it is has a huge learning curve.
 

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I believe that as I age I need to constantly learn new things, things that take time, effort and study in order to exercise my brain. Beekeeping is my new adventure in learning, and, as I am quickly finding out, it is has a huge learning curve.
You just described my reasons for starting in beekeeping this year. I am boarder line diabetic ,so my doctor says, so I better watch my intake of honey but in all honesty, I never really ate that much honey at all . I love it but hardly ever bought it and a jar would last me a year. I find enjoyment a peace when I just go out and sit by my only beehive and watch as they come and go and carry on with their chores and way of life. Come Spring, I will have one or two more colonies in my yard but right now,both my wife and I are enjoying what we have.
 

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If you get a bunch of honey and put it on a slice of bread. Let it sit for a couple of minutes, then peanut butter the other half?
This. I thought I was the only one. If that honey side gets a little "crunchy" from the honey ... oh man. My mouth is watering.

I got into this to save money.

(Waits while laughter subsides.)

I love honey but I am afraid of bees. I received a VA newsletter in which I learned of the Heroes to Hives program and since I love honey and am a mead maker, it sort of resonated with me, which amazed my wife. The more I learn, the more comfortable I am around them - with a veil on anyway.

What I have learned to enjoy, however, is the calm. Even if I am working with a hotter hive, I need to be right there and nowhere else. I can't be thinking of work, I can't be thinking of traffic, I have to be there with the bees. Without sounding like a victim I do have some residual effects from my time in the military and I have a hard time calming my mind. Holding a frame of bees and watching them do their thing is the best therapy I have found. It leaves me calm for a long time after.

Interestingly, another thing that gives me this calm is shaving with a straight razor. You can't be thinking of anything else when you do that. Since COVID I don't shave every day, but when I do, it's very relaxing. Of course, the one thing that will make a guy move faster than anything else is shaving with a straight razor, naked out of the shower, and dropping the razor. Pretty sure I have levitated.
 

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This. I thought I was the only one. If that honey side gets a little "crunchy" from the honey ... oh man. My mouth is watering.

I got into this to save money.

(Waits while laughter subsides.)

I love honey but I am afraid of bees. I received a VA newsletter in which I learned of the Heroes to Hives program and since I love honey and am a mead maker, it sort of resonated with me, which amazed my wife. The more I learn, the more comfortable I am around them - with a veil on anyway.

What I have learned to enjoy, however, is the calm. Even if I am working with a hotter hive, I need to be right there and nowhere else. I can't be thinking of work, I can't be thinking of traffic, I have to be there with the bees. Without sounding like a victim I do have some residual effects from my time in the military and I have a hard time calming my mind. Holding a frame of bees and watching them do their thing is the best therapy I have found. It leaves me calm for a long time after.

Interestingly, another thing that gives me this calm is shaving with a straight razor. You can't be thinking of anything else when you do that. Since COVID I don't shave every day, but when I do, it's very relaxing. Of course, the one thing that will make a guy move faster than anything else is shaving with a straight razor, naked out of the shower, and dropping the razor. Pretty sure I have levitated.
After two tours in Vietnam,I can relate to many years of my thoughts being messed up and if I only knew then what I know now,I would have started beekeeping way before now at 74 years old.
 

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This. I thought I was the only one. If that honey side gets a little "crunchy" from the honey ... oh man. My mouth is watering.

I got into this to save money.

(Waits while laughter subsides.)

I love honey but I am afraid of bees. I received a VA newsletter in which I learned of the Heroes to Hives program and since I love honey and am a mead maker, it sort of resonated with me, which amazed my wife. The more I learn, the more comfortable I am around them - with a veil on anyway.

What I have learned to enjoy, however, is the calm. Even if I am working with a hotter hive, I need to be right there and nowhere else. I can't be thinking of work, I can't be thinking of traffic, I have to be there with the bees. Without sounding like a victim I do have some residual effects from my time in the military and I have a hard time calming my mind. Holding a frame of bees and watching them do their thing is the best therapy I have found. It leaves me calm for a long time after.

Interestingly, another thing that gives me this calm is shaving with a straight razor. You can't be thinking of anything else when you do that. Since COVID I don't shave every day, but when I do, it's very relaxing. Of course, the one thing that will make a guy move faster than anything else is shaving with a straight razor, naked out of the shower, and dropping the razor. Pretty sure I have levitated.
I have an old German Straight Razor myself. I haven't had to actually sharpen it yet, but there is an art to using the strop . You can get one even sharper it seems depending on the pressure you use. Light pressure. More sharp.
It doesn't get used much nowadays though. LOL! My beard is down to my chest. :)
 

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Sharpening a straight is a bit of an art form in itself. I have some Japanese Natural stones (JNats) for sharpening, as well as a host of synthetic ones. I always give up and send them to someone who knows what they are doing. The strop is to remove the "wire edge" that can grow during sharpening and keep it gone in between uses. I have some nice leather strops, as well as some made from an old fire hose that works really well believe it or not. My go-to razor is one of my vintage Spanish Filarmonicas, but I have a few Feathers with the replaceable blades like a barber uses that get some use in the rotation.

And ... Bees! Have to stay on topic. My mind wanders. :)
 

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I am afraid of bees

A lot of folks connect thier fear of bees to yellow jackets and wasps. They are quite differnt. Many people handle bees in shorts and a wife beater and are perfectly fine. You just have to learn about them like anything else.
 

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A lot of folks connect thier fear of bees to yellow jackets and wasps.
Intellectually, I know you are right. I can handle it all when I am prepared for it. When I am not, I still go all reptilian brain.

It took me 55 years to get like this, I may not reverse it in my first year. :)
 
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