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They do get some sun in the morning, but are in shade the rest of the day. When I started out everything I read, and a LOT of people told me, put them in FULL sun, except one book said calico shade in the afternoon. When you are trying to catch a swarm, you are told to put the box in the shade.

I did set up my hives in full sun, before I got my bees. Then one day, on a nice hot day, I went out to my hives, man it was SCORCHING. So the next day I moved them to their current location. I am just a hobby keeper, and a brand spanking new one at that, with a whole 4 months under my belt. So remember, what works for someone in a moderate climate may not work for you if you have temperature extreems.

Just figured I'd share my observations.
 

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Other than the fact that it was scorching, was there another reason that you moved them? Just curious as to why you thought that location wasn't working.

The one time I had four of my hives in full sun (Sacramento, CA. area) they absconded more than any other year. I moved them into morning sun, afternoon shade the following year. Been there every since.
 

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Never did have bees there just the hives. I moved the hives, before I got the bees, because of the heat. Didn't have to move them far, just about 20 feet to get them under the trees. I figured 171 degrees in full sun was a bit too hot.
 

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I like mine in the shade. Morning sun is nice, but afternoon shade makes working them bearable. Winter they get full sun most of the day.
 

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Every location is different, what works for one won't work for another, I keep mine in full sun, have tried partial shade but the pests do a job on them. I do keep them well ventilated summer and winter. I think many under-value the advantages of well ventilated hives. Of course I imagine sub-zero weather could change my mind, but I won't see that here.
 

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I think my bees do better with late afternoon shade. It just gets too hot here in the summertime.
Anytime we get a chance they get placed in the best summer shade zone....the north east corner of 500 year old oak trees. Morning sun. Winter sun. Summer afternoon shade. All they need now is a Hammock! and a cool drink! Lemonade anyone?

Surprisingly we have a Star thistle flow right now. Guess that's B-Lemonade. Bring it on!!
 

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Surprisingly we have a Star thistle flow right now. Guess that's B-Lemonade. Bring it on!!
The only year I anticipated a star thistle flow I was taken aback when I harvested the honey. I had the labels that indicated it was from star thistle all printed up and everything but when I put the honey in jars, it was the darkest honey I had ever seen and had that slight molasses flavor. Obviously the bees had other plants in mind that Summer. Probably California Buckwheat. Not complaining as I sold that honey for more money due to the "Gourmet" labels I put on it.
 

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To topic of the thread is misleading. There is no answer to the question in the body of the message. Now I won't be able to sleep wondering what was the reason. :)

All my hives sit in full Florida sun all summer long. It is my observation that it helps bees to deal with SHB better. With a screened bottom board I get no bearding on the outside of the hive, which is your first clue that your bees are getting hot.
 

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Those infrared thermometers can be grossly inaccurate in certain conditions. That said, it was probably a good call to move yours from the sun. Even here where we don't get very many 100 degree days, ours get morning sun and dappled shade starting around mid-day. They are out and about very early in the morning and they're still flying very late. We got four swarms this year and they did seem less active (we placed them in full shade when we moved them in). We've got them in their permanent locations now, though, so they should be better off now.
 

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They say swarms pick shady placed for their permanent home...they did that in my field. I guess the bees tell us what they like if they get chance.

However many beeks are looking for maximum production and the bee that is looking for a comfy home is not.


View attachment 12262

They do get some sun in the morning, but are in shade the rest of the day. When I started out everything I read, and a LOT of people told me, put them in FULL sun, except one book said calico shade in the afternoon. When you are trying to catch a swarm, you are told to put the box in the shade.

I did set up my hives in full sun, before I got my bees. Then one day, on a nice hot day, I went out to my hives, man it was SCORCHING. So the next day I moved them to their current location. I am just a hobby keeper, and a brand spanking new one at that, with a whole 4 months under my belt. So remember, what works for someone in a moderate climate may not work for you if you have temperature extreems.

Just figured I'd share my observations.
 

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My very-modest bee yard sits beneath a grove of hardwood trees in the middle of a pasture on our farm. It's a cool, shaded, southward-facing place that gets full sun (summer and winter) every evening, and the bees love it ... as do I. It is, simply, (ahem...) a very pleasant place to "bee." ;)
 
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