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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First year with bees, so I have a lot of learning to do.

First time this year it’s getting in the 50s every night, and I go outside to check on the bees regularly and I see them on the ground, and walls, and crawling around.

They are cold and stranded and dying by the looks of it. Tonight the ground is littered with stranded cold and wet bees. Why are they on the ground? Why aren’t they in their hive staying warm?

I feel bad and I want to save them
But there isn’t anything I can do really.
 

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Take a closer look at the bees. Do you see any irregularities? Stubby, crinkled wings? Wings spread out in a "K" shape?
Do their abdomens appear to be shorter than usual?

If so, you could have issues related to Varroa or Tracheal Mites.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
They appear to be regular working bees. Last night was probably 50 of them stuck outside their home.

I just vaporized the hives two days ago. I haven’t checked the sticky boards to see if I have any problems yet but I hoped that would relieve the problems.

The main have is very large and populous last check over the weekend. Maybe they are thinning their numbers. I’m not sure what is normal but the deep I got into was full of bees.
 

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I do, i take something flat and put hotwater in it cover it with glad wrap tightly and i put a papertowl on that and i take a coffee stire from starbucks several and i pick the ones up that dont look so wet and a little dry and put them on the contaier to woarm up and they warm up and fly away, some do anyway. i try to save them.
 

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They appear to be regular working bees. Last night was probably 50 of them stuck outside their home.

I just vaporized the hives two days ago. I haven’t checked the sticky boards to see if I have any problems yet but I hoped that would relieve the problems.

The main have is very large and populous last check over the weekend. Maybe they are thinning their numbers. I’m not sure what is normal but the deep I got into was full of bees.
If this was the first treatment, you are too late. Hive treatments need to happen in August in order to raise healthy bees that will raise the winter bees. Weeks can make a big difference in treatment success. When I started, I was treating mid September and was having 50% losses. I moved my treatments up 4 weeks to August and my loss rate dropped to about 20%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
They appear to be regular working bees. Last night was probably 50 of them stuck outside their home.

I just vaporized the hives two days ago. I haven’t checked the sticky boards to see if I have any problems yet but I hoped that would relieve the problems.

The main have is very large and populous last check over the weekend. Maybe they are thinning their numbers. I’m not sure what is normal but the deep I got into was full of bees.
If this was the first treatment, you are too late. Hive treatments need to happen in August in order to raise healthy bees that will raise the winter bees. Weeks can make a big difference in treatment success. When I started, I was treating mid September and was having 50% losses. I moved my treatments up 4 weeks to August and my loss rate dropped to about 20%.
In August the temps are still in the 90s here in Houston with brood production in full swing and honey supers on. Do you Recommend treating irrigatdless or site conditions?
 

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I think that if mite counts are high that you must MAKE the conditions right to enable some form of treatment or you risk mite collapse while you wait. Some treatments are temperature sensitive and could not be used but others could. Honey supers can be blocked off temporarily for some treatments. Oxalic acid dribble comes to mind.
=
 

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It's normal. Up here, 2/3 of the bees in the hive dying before winter is over isn't unusual. Still, I wasn't prepared to see that many dead outside the hive.

It's probably leftover summer bees that just don't make it home in time. I see lots of them every year but don't have a freakout over it. Sometimes I pick them up and breath warm air on them in my cupped hands and they come back to life. Sometimes I try to toss them into the hive. Most times I just accept it because mice, or my chickens, gotta eat too.
 

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...it’s getting in the 50s every night, and I go outside to check on the bees regularly and I see them on the ground, and walls, and crawling around.
...
I always see stranded bees around hives, however only on clear days when the day temperature is lower than 55°F. A lot of them, if not all, are returning foragers, obviously loaded with pollen and nectar. This happens pretty often during winter months or in the summer when, because of the afternoon ocean breeze, the temperature quickly drops into the lower fifties.

Most people fail to see this because the surface their hives sit on, like grass, large-size gravel etc., hides all the bees. I can see every single bee on the concrete.

Who knows, these stranded bees could be weakened by virus, tracheal mites or phorid fly infections that reveal themselves in extreme conditions like cold weather.
I once collected a few hundred of these stranded, chilled bees in a closed plastic container and let it float in a pan filled with warm water. After fifteen or so minutes all the bees, except for a few already dead, went back to life and when released apparently returned to their hives.
 

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Is it not one of the symptoms of nosema that bees engage in unusual cold condition foraging? also something about it compromising their body thermo regulation process.
 

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Is it not one of the symptoms of nosema that bees engage in unusual cold condition foraging?...
It might also depend on the local climate. Could be disease. Could be the vegetation finally coming back to life after the slumber of this year's spring-summer-fall drought. Eucalyptus and rosemary are blooming. The bees bring white, yellow, red and bluish pollen.
 

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It might also depend on the local climate. Could be disease. Could be the vegetation finally coming back to life after the slumber of this year's spring-summer-fall drought. Eucalyptus and rosemary are blooming. The bees bring white, yellow, red and bluish pollen.
It is supposed to be Zero Fahrenheit here tonight. Local conditions really can be a considerable variable!;)

I am trying a no fly upper vent this year for a first and the colonies appear to be throwing off fewer snow divers. It will be close to the end of March before we get the first pollen comeing in.
 
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