Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A fellow newbie is seeing drones being pulled out (see photo below). Why would they be doing this at this time of year? I would have thought they would be starting drone production. This is in Portland, OR where we have been having a typically wet and cool (highs generally on low to mid 50s).

I will say this hive is booming and overwintered quite successfully.

Appreciate any thoughts.

Kevin

62647
 

·
Super Moderator
Santa Cruz, CA
Joined
·
1,157 Posts
The wings look deformed and undeveloped. They may be suffering the effects of mites in the hives and you have hygienic bees pulling them out before fully developed.

Have you checked your mite load? Mites love drone brood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,560 Posts
The wings look deformed and undeveloped. They may be suffering the effects of mites on the hives and you have hygienic bees pulling them out before fully developed.

Have you checked your mite load? Mites love drone brood.
I was thinking the same thing, but I couldn't remember at what stage the wings become fully formed.

Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
I had some pulled out the day after an OAV treatment using a wand. I think the wand cooked them at the frame bottom then they were pulled out. Does your friend use an OAV wand?
 

·
Super Moderator
Santa Cruz, CA
Joined
·
1,157 Posts
They are certainly pulling them out for one reason or another. I'd start with the mite load and go from there.

Good news is that the bees are representing hygienic behavior. As such, probably not much to worry about other than keeping on top of mites 'n things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
A fellow newbie is seeing drones being pulled out (see photo below). Why would they be doing this at this time of year? I would have thought they would be starting drone production. This is in Portland, OR where we have been having a typically wet and cool (highs generally on low to mid 50s).

I will say this hive is booming and overwintered quite successfully.

Appreciate any thoughts.

Kevin

View attachment 62647
The mite idea is certainly worth serious consideration. I have had drone pupa removed in early spring after I made a really thin split, probably due to lack of resources (although I was feeding them). Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sorry for my delay in responding.

My friend does not treat at all and I now realize that they were exhibiting this same behavior in mid winter which makes more sense than now, though. Also, these were not a VSH line of bees.
 

·
Super Moderator
Santa Cruz, CA
Joined
·
1,157 Posts
They are definitely hygienic, even without the fancy "VSH" label.

And isn't it interesting that we can tell there is a high mite load by simple things such as drones being pulled out? This is why I originally asked the question.

If it's surviving treatment free and that's how they want it - it may survive fine but is certainly showing the effects from the mites.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top