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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking ahead for spring and am planning on expanding my apiary with a few splits (hopefully my bees make it through the winter) and buying a few new nuc's. Can anyone suggest a VSH queen supplier with an hour or two of New Jersey. I'm figuring small buys 3-6 in early spring depending on how well my current bees survive and then a similar order as I split the new nuc's. I'd like be able to drive and pick up the queens and introduce them at the same time I do the splits. From what I've read, it's better to introduce the queens at the same time as the \='
 

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Ok, the 90 pound puppy, "Hey Get Back Here" decided to lay its head on the keypad of my laptop and forced a post. To continue-...introduce the queens at the same time as the splits. I like to do a second round of splits with the new nuc's as the fill up the second brood box, figuring here in mid-late April. Same deal, I fear the post office and other carriers on this and would want to pick up local climate acclimated ladies. I'm looking at new, strong genetics on this go around, breeding my own later on. Any suggestions?
 

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65 colonies +/- mostly Langstroth mediums, a few deeps for nuc production
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I don't ship so may be too far away but I raise VSH Queens from II breeder Queens in Powhatan VA.
 

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LarryBud, I'm in mid Missouri. As far as I know in my state there is 1 queen breeder, he's about 250 miles. I'd be happy too if someone were closer. It's not like Amazon.

Good Luck
 

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Ok, the 90 pound puppy, "Hey Get Back Here" decided to lay its head on the keypad of my laptop and forced a post. To continue-...introduce the queens at the same time as the splits. I like to do a second round of splits with the new nuc's as the fill up the second brood box, figuring here in mid-late April. Same deal, I fear the post office and other carriers on this and would want to pick up local climate acclimated ladies. I'm looking at new, strong genetics on this go around, breeding my own later on. Any suggestions?
Why don’t you try Michael Palmer queens? They ship very fast, Vermont, next day this past July.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry for the delay in a response-this pesky day job has issues as we get jobs finished up before the snow flies! John, thank you for the reply, I map quested the distance to you and its just over 300 miles. Possible but it would make for a long day, I'll PM you to discuss. I know Michael Palmer's queens are excellent, but July is probably too late. I may be overly optimistic, but I'd like to get the hives going as early as realistic possible. I've been looking around on line and I'm hoping to find something that will be successful in my climate. I'm reading about artificially inseminated pure-bred ($$$$), closed ($$) and open breeding ($). I'm not sure of my wife can afford pure-bred and I hate like hell having big dollar queens arrive dead or not make the winter here (or summer). My hope is that I'd be able to get some genetic improvement from the drone offspring to mate with my mutts if I'm able to raise some queens from planned splits this spring and even help out with the local bees in the longer term. Open to suggestions.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Larry, I think you will be happy with any queens you purchase from John Davis. He has given talks at our bee club and sold queens to some of the folks I talk with outside of Beesource. 300 miles is nothing. Let me know when you plan to come down and maybe we can meet for lunch.🍕
 

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Thanks for the kind words JW.
Larry you are correct in your observation II Queens are expensive and not necessary unless you are raising a lot of queens.
Their open mated daughters (f1) and granddaughters (f2) do well. After that since the genetics are recessive they get diluted and not expressed well unless the Queens have mated with drones also carrying the desired traits. The good news is that the drones produced by the f1 daughters carry the genes so having them to provide males helps to keep the genetics on track longer.
 

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Sorry for the delay in a response-this pesky day job has issues as we get jobs finished up before the snow flies! John, thank you for the reply, I map quested the distance to you and its just over 300 miles. Possible but it would make for a long day, I'll PM you to discuss. I know Michael Palmer's queens are excellent, but July is probably too late. I may be overly optimistic, but I'd like to get the hives going as early as realistic possible. I've been looking around on line and I'm hoping to find something that will be successful in my climate. I'm reading about artificially inseminated pure-bred ($$$$), closed ($$) and open breeding ($). I'm not sure of my wife can afford pure-bred and I hate like hell having big dollar queens arrive dead or not make the winter here (or summer). My hope is that I'd be able to get some genetic improvement from the drone offspring to mate with my mutts if I'm able to raise some queens from planned splits this spring and even help out with the local bees in the longer term. Open to suggestions.
I hive the queens in double nucs and they winter very well, and have even harvested honey from them that year. Thus year I harvested at least a super from them, they came July 7 I think. Fortunately, I do not feed in the Fall they usually have plenty of nectar here; in Spring they are hived in 10 frame hives. I am north of you and our Wnter weather starts sooner than yours in central Jersey, and is colder and longer. Those genetics would be good for your area. My opinion.:)
 
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