Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm developing a leather care product and I want to use my own beeswax. I want white wax only so the product doesn't darken the leather (as much). I read recently that white wax can be achieved by chemical bleaching or sun bleaching. I don't want to even think about the chemical route. But if solar bleaching works I'd like to try that. What's the best way to achieve a good solar bleaching? Can the wax be solar bleached to be totally white? Or just less yellow?

Also, I'm assuming the best way to do this is re-render the big blocks of yellow wax I get out of my solar wax melter into thin flat sheets so the Sun rays can fully penetrate. Is that the right idea? And finally, how long does it typically take you using your method to get beeswax white enough to call "white" for whatever your intended application is?

For extra credit: Why is wax always white in the melter just after turning solid but long before it's fully cooled? What makes it turn dark when it's fully cooled?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I boil mine several times in water and each boiling makes it lighter colored, though I haven't tried to make it white. For the first boiling, I strain out debris with a metal strainer, then in subsequent boilings I just scrape the propolis off the bottom until it produces no more propolis. I suppose straining it through the t-shirt material would remove the smallest debris that gives it color. I may try that this summer just for kicks.
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,171 Posts
It needs to be a very thin layer and hot sunlight will melt it. It does bleach. I wasn't really trying to bleach it, I was wax dipping PermaComb and ended up with a sheet of wax on the wood where I was slamming the combs to knock out the wax. It got very white if left in the sun for a day or two. I scraped it off from time to time.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top