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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read somewhere, but can't find it now, where a guy was using White Lightning adhesive caulk instead of wood glue in his box joints during hive body construction. He testified that it was superior in strength. Just wondering if anyone on here has tried it. I have a lot of boxes to build right away and don't want to experiment if I don't have to. I have used Titebond before but not sure if it worked as well as this might. I plan to use either smooth cement coated 2 3/8 nails or maybe deck screws. I tried ring shanked galvanized 2" nails in my Porter Cable framing nailer, but it split the box joint fingers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't know anything about White lighting adhesive, but I will testify to the strength of titebond II. If used properly and allowed to cure the glue is stronger than the wood, so if it breaks it won't be the glue that does. How much stronger than THAT do you need?
I know Titebond II is good stuff on interior applications, but I wasn't sure if it would eventually turn loose of the wood after a few years of exposure to the the weather. Have you had some boxes in the weather for 5 years or longer with the Titebond II?

Rod, do you apply the glue to all three sides of each finger of a box joint--side grain and end grain too?
 

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I know Titebond II is good stuff on interior applications, but I wasn't sure if it would eventually turn loose of the wood after a few years of exposure to the the weather. Have you had some boxes in the weather for 5 years or longer with the Titebond II?

Rod, do you apply the glue to all three sides of each finger of a box joint--side grain and end grain too?
I have boxes that are 10 years old that I didn't put glue on that are still serviceable, but since I have had a clue about what I've been doing the glue goes on the inside of the joint and then after the box is together(nailed) I literally paint the end grain with the glue, then of course the box is painted. As to your worries about titebond II being weather hardy, what you have to understand is the only difference in the waterproof of II and III is that III can handle being boiled and not come apart. As I've said many times on here before I don't boil my hives, if I did (wax/gum treatment) I guess I'd use III.
 
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