Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
First year beek stressing about overwintering bees. My latest worries are ventilation and feeding.

Have two langs with screen bottom boards. I would like the option of adding a sugar brick later in the season.

I think I'm supposed to turn the inner cover over to give a little more space at the top of the hive. Is that correct? Have also heard that adding an Imirie shim on top helps with winter ventilation. If I do this should the shim go below the inner cover or above it?

Thanks for the feedback.

Erik
 

·
Registered
65 colonies +/- mostly Langstroth mediums, a few deeps for nuc production
Joined
·
475 Posts
Depending on your equipment usually the inner cover has one side that has about an eighth inch space (the bottom) and about 3/8 inch on the other. Some have a notch in the end of the 3/8 recessed side for ventilation or an upper entrance if you slide the telescoping cover far enough that they can get in and out. They are designed that way so the total of the space above the top of the frames in the box + the space on the bottom of the inner cover gives you "proper" bee space. Also proper space above the inner cover. Turning the inner cover over does not give you much space for solid food. The shim gives you the best of both. If you are able to its easy and inexpensive to use 1x2 furring strip material to make a rectangle that fits on top you upper box. You can drill a 1/2 to 3/4 inch in the shim for ventilation, and you have an extra 1 1/2 in in height for feeding solid food or in warmer weather liquid in a baggie. The inner cover goes on top with bee space up as usual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
I made some shims for my hives in my woodshop and I placed them just under the inner cover so that I could put a sugar brick on top of the top hive body frames.

I am going to try a few quilt boxes on 4 of my hives this year. I made a taller shim with an entrance on it to put just underneath the quilt box so that I could still feed. Will
just have to remove the quilt box if I need to get into the box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,518 Posts
I put a 2 1/2 feed shim with a 3/4 round hole directly above the top brood. I make sugar blocks available starting about Dec 1 and can feed pollen patties before first pollen. The round hole usually becomes the primary entrance over the winter.

I then install my inner cover with notch in front rim facing up. This serves as back up ventilation if bottom entrance were to get blocked and also vents cavity between top side of inner cover and telescopic cover.

I have been using quilt boxes for the past two years above the inner cover and then telescopic cover. Quilt boxes work very well.

I reduce the bottom entrance down to two side 3/8 by 1/2 inch wide. Screen bottom board is blocked and insulation is placed below it. This provides minimal but adequate fresh air and venting of moisture. In my view, there is no purpose to excessive drafting that will negate the purpose of exterior insulation and wrapping. With excessive drafting by open screen bottom boards and wide bottom entrances, the interior temp will be nearly the same as the exterior temp. My winter air is usually quite dry so this works here but this minimal ventilation may not be enough in a more humid area.

Bees winter extremely well (no losses with seven hives) with huge spring populations.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top