Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Because of some travel scheduling and hive locations I am planning to remove the capped supers I plan to harvest a few days before I actually extract the honey. I am just looking for advice on where to put these supers in the meantime. I can store them down in the cellar inside the house, for example, but should I put them in any kind of containers to protect them? Thanks.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,203 Posts
If you put them in the celler they should be cool enough that is number one and I would also bag the boxes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Under the conditions you describe, I would either stand them on end on your basement floor in or on something that would catch any dripping honey and/or wax. There is no need to bag the boxes. Assuming your cellar is a closed space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Acebird. We are in VT, so it is pretty cool down there, thankfully. Should I bag just with a regular plastic garbage bag adn twist-tie the end?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
No, no you shouldn't. What is there to protect the supers from? Doing so will contain moisture. Doing so is unnecessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
850 Posts
Here in Virginia we stored ours for at least 4 days in a make shift warming room. A big closet with a heater and de humidifier. No problem. I have also stored them in my living room- but yes, put something under them to catch the drip.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,203 Posts
Doing so will keep out moisture and anything else that might be in his basement (the basement will be more moist then the apiary). I can see harm if you don't do it and see no harm if you do.

Yes, tie wrap the bag as tight as you can get it. When we did it we put all three boxes in one bag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
Why would you guys advise to keep them cool? They don't extract well when cool. I have a hot room and hold them at about 90. As for bagging them I wouldn't. They will drip but bags would be a pain. I use drip trays that work like mini pallets and can bee moved with a hand truck. Unless you have a lot to move the best place to store them is on the hive until extraction day
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
I could not agree more danno, but the OPer asked about storing supers in the basement for a couple of days. So that is what we have to deal w/ here and what we should be basing advice on.

Why the super(s) can't be left on the hive(s) I don't know. That's what I would do had I a small number of supers to extract.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
Because of some travel scheduling and hive locations I am planning to remove the capped supers I plan to harvest a few days before I actually extract the honey. I am just looking for advice on where to put these supers in the meantime. I can store them down in the cellar inside the house, for example, but should I put them in any kind of containers to protect them? Thanks.
I'm just a new beek, but the easy answer to your question is just leave them on the hive until you're ready to extract. :thumbsup:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,203 Posts
Mark when I put the boxes on their side in the apiary (remember when I had that worm problem) there were every insect know to man except bees after those frames. Most of them looked like flies.
A basement in NY and VT is loaded with mold, insects and spiders and who knows what else. The OP said a couple of days. He is going to leave them and go away not knowing what will consume his time when he gets back. It might be two days, it might be two weeks. If he is like me it could be two months. The best intentions do not account for reality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
I can only go on what the OPer has said and answer him as if he is goingt to do what he says he is going to do. I cannot advise someone on what they might do. Sure, he could get hit by a truck walking to his car from Walmart, if they had any Walmarts in VT.

If I were doing what he says he will do, but do it in my basement, dirt floor and stone walled foundation, I would have no qualms about standing the super on end on a set of boards on the floor of my cellar. Or even stacking them on a upside down cover.

I see no need to take special precautions against bugs or rodents or whatever. And I do not like the idea of bagging them.

Bottom line. It doesn't matter. He should read what we write and figure out what he thinks is best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
If you can't leave them on the hives for a couple days, just stack them anywhere critters can't get them and don't worry about them. No need to wrap, bag, stand on end or keep cool. If they do perfectly fine sitting on top of hot hive in the middle of a sun-baked apiary, why would they suddenly have a need to stay cool?

I've once had supers stacked in my kitchen in Maine for over a month. (Don't ask.) But they survived just fine.

Wayne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,487 Posts
They will be fine for a few days as long as ants don't find them. I stack mine over a full sheet pan with a little water in the pan, with a couple pieces of wood holding the super out of the water.
Warm honey extracts easier than cold, so I like to put them in a warm room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
I did until I moved south to PA this past spring. And all the major appliances were in the kitchen and not out on the porch as those from away always seem to think is the case.

Wayne
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top