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I am new to beekeeping and installed bees two weeks ago. I was wondering when I should stop feeding my bees. I started with all new equipment and foundation. They seem to be building fast and doing good. Are there indicators I should looks for to know when to stop feeding? Also, do I need to keep feeding or start again when I add the seconds deep super with new foundation to promote better comb building on the new foundation or leave it to the bees?
 

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Many possible answers. I can tell you what I would do. I would look if they are brining in pollen. If the answer is yes, and you see lots of it, than stop feeding. Let the bees do what they do best, get their own food.
 

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I like to use packages to draw comb, and feed until they begin the backfill the brood chamber. or a flow comes on.

basically feed until a flow comes on... When your first deep is 80% drawn out place a second and continue to feed unless a flow begins. you will know when a flow begins, because the bees will quit taking the syrup.
The only time you have to stop is if they backfill in which case they will fill the brood chamber with syrup leaving inadequate space for the queen to lay.
 

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Three weeks ago I installed my 5frm nucs into the 10frm box and fed them. I went into the boxes after 2 weeks and they were putting the syrup EVERYWHERE....even into the brood area so I took em right off. They built quite a bit of comb during that period but it looked syrup bound to me. plenty of pollen coming in so I'll watch but figure at this point they seem to be doing all right. My first time too but it seemed like the right thing to do at the time.
 

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If there was a flow when I installed them I wouldn't feed them at all, but once I start I try to feed until they have a least a small amount of drawn comb. Then I stop. Up until then some rainy weather could leave them in a bind.
 

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If there was a flow when I installed them I wouldn't feed them at all, but once I start I try to feed until they have a least a small amount of drawn comb. Then I stop. Up until then some rainy weather could leave them in a bind.
Michael B - If you install a package with a couple frames of drawn comb with about 1/4 honey in each and foundation on the rest - Would a person need to worry much about feeding in the beginning , or is it good to feed anyway till the flow starts?
 

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Three weeks ago I installed my 5frm nucs into the 10frm box and fed them. I went into the boxes after 2 weeks and they were putting the syrup EVERYWHERE....even into the brood area so I took em right off. They built quite a bit of comb during that period but it looked syrup bound to me. plenty of pollen coming in so I'll watch but figure at this point they seem to be doing all right. My first time too but it seemed like the right thing to do at the time.
Oh my goodness. This is what you want. Don't stop them now, give them another box to fill. A commercial guy would certainly think otherwise. But for backyard guys it is not about making a buck, by saving a buck. It is about giving the girls every chance, so that we have something to play next year too.
 

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>Michael B - If you install a package with a couple frames of drawn comb with about 1/4 honey in each and foundation on the rest - Would a person need to worry much about feeding in the beginning , or is it good to feed anyway till the flow starts?

I only feed until "A" flow not "THE" flow. I think most of North America has "A" flow right now. And if they have some stores as well... I would not be feeding them.
 

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The only time you have to stop is if they backfill in which case they will fill the brood chamber with syrup leaving inadequate space for the queen to lay.
So if they do start limiting space for the queen with syrup but they are not bringing in nectar, what should be done since stopping feeding usually isn't done until they quit taking it and have begun getting "the real stuff?" juzzer
 

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JBee question begs an answer re "not bringing in nectar". How CAN one tell if they're bringin in nectar? Pollen ya see. Propolis ya see. Nectar and water is in their honey stomache so how can ya tell if they're bringin it in since ya cant see it cept by opening up tha hive?
 

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Not to be a smart ***** here but they call it inspection for a reason. Gotta do your inspections to make sure the stores are there.
 

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Not to be a smart ***** here but they call it inspection for a reason. Gotta do your inspections to make sure the stores are there.
I think all of us on this Beekeeping 101(beginner questions) thread understand what an inspection is for(not to sound like a smart***).

My post is simply asking that if during my inspection, I inspect that there is an amount of sugar syrup stores, limiting the room for her to lay, should feeding be stopped if there is not nectar coming in yet? The "majority" has told me never stop feeding until nectar is being brought in. But yet, some point out that if they fill the brood area and not much nectar is being brought in, feeding should be stopped anyway???? juzzer
 

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juzzerbee,

I think that is a good question for us new people. I hived my pkg on the 14th. The girls have drawn out
7 of the 10 frames in the deep box. I see quite a bit of backfilling!
I placed another deep box on today because it seems like a good thing to do.
Here in my part of Alaska there is no pollen or nectar yet for them.
So do I need feeding ? Should be seeing willow pollen within the next week.
 

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If you keep feeding...and the bees are building comb and filling it with syrup, why won't the bees move the syrup around to placate the queen? Seems like the bees could figure it out. How would feeding be any different than a honey flow with the workers moving stuff around?
 

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>The "majority" has told me never stop feeding until nectar is being brought in.

I assume we are talking about packages. I doubt there is anywhere in the US right now that nectar is not being brought in. As far as overwintered hives, I have fed none of them in the spring for the last 12 years or so. I have fed none of them in the fall for the last 6 years or so. I would if they needed it.

http://bushfarms.com/beesfeeding.htm
 

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Michael- So if needs are to build comb in the brood boxes, then feed if people want to? If there is drawn comb at this time then don't feed?

So to throw everyone another curve ball scenario... I will be installing packages into drawn hive bodies this weekend(Saturday???). My area has rain forecasted until this Friday and then hopefully that is what Wisconsin will need to see buds pop out. There is not much at all for blooms currently. Would you feed the newly installed package if they will have an entire medium hive body already drawn? Thanks, juzzer
 

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>Michael- So if needs are to build comb in the brood boxes, then feed if people want to?

Feeding causes problems. It can solve problems. If you don't have any problems that feeding can solve, why create the problems that feeding causes?

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfeeding.htm#when

> If there is drawn comb at this time then don't feed?

And an nectar flow? Then no. If they have no stores and no nectar coming in, I would definitely feed.
 
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