Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering when do you stop feeding 2:1. Last week my bees where still taking it. Had highs in the 60s I have a nuc box that I have some mason jar feeders in them somewhat like a community type of feeding station but doesn't get the crazy bee frenzy. And then have some pollen sub that I tried out this year set next to it. This week we had our first hard freeze here in Oklahoma, lows in the teens, but next week highs back in the 60s. I use round rapid feeders in my hives also. I have probably 4 gallons of 2:1 mixed up should I just feed it to them till it's gone or they stop taking it. Or should I remove it. I think I read somewhere that they needed time to cure it or cap it before prolonged weeks of highs in the 30s. That doesn't happen much here not for weeks on end at least and usually not till January. I like the stores they have in their hives, just didn't know if it is fine to keep feeding them 2:1 for as long as they will take it without getting into their own stores yet. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,933 Posts
How many colonies are you feeding and what are the hive configurations? I start feeding 5:3 the first week of October, and try to finish all feeding before the 1st of November. If the colonies are in double deeps I feed until the top box is full and I grunt when I heft the rear of the hive. If the colonies are in single deeps I feed until the bees stop taking the syrup. This year I took the last feeder off on October 31.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a 5 x 5 with a round rapid feeder in it still and a double 10 frame with a round rapid in there also. My other hives I dont have any feeders in them they are all with double 10 frames plus 1 medium on it.
I was just going to let the 2 hives finish up with what they have in the hives and then take them off, but was still going to leave the open feeder out to see if they wanted any on days that it was warm enough to fly around. Or should I remove that also and put it back out late winter early spring
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,933 Posts
I would heft the colonies and if any are light I would feed those. I want to finish feeding with enough warm days for the colony to organize it's food and brood nest, then I leave them alone until late February or early March when I prepare to spring feed. I am not a fan of open feeding during the cold months. As I said in my other post, I want them ready for winter by November 1, and then I leave them alone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,691 Posts
That's the problem with open feeding some hives may get more than they need, others less.


But when to stop? That is determined by when there is enough feed in each hive to get them through winter and early spring. So you need to know how much that is, for some it is a full box of honey, for others it may be a 3/4 full box. If this is your first season, take note how much honey is in the hives, then next spring see how that has worked out for them, then for future seasons you will know what is required.

If open feeding, you cannot really determine it by how much sugar you have put in the open feeders. There are normally other bees helping themselves to your sugar, so you have to take an actual look in your hives and see when they have enough stored.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top