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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I plan on using the honey frame excluder method in my TBH, always keeping an empty 1 1/4" bar in front of the honey frame and a 1 1/2" empty bar behind the honey frame. I currently have ten 1 1/4" bars stacked in the front of the hive. How do I know when the bees are transitioning from brood to honey comb? I'm afraid they'll start building honey comb on 1 1/4" frames and I'll get cross comb.
 

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I have 14 1/4 bars, and the rest are 1 1/2, all are on the hive. Last year when they got to the wider bar they started putting honey there. This year I plan on inserting bars into the brood, and honey areas as the season progresses. Maybe they know when the combs can be bigger, maybe I got lucky? Good luck, a lot of the fun in beekeeping is the learning part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The bees have really slowed down on comb production since removing the syrup, so I'm still waiting for a "fat comb". They have about 8 bars started.
 

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Depending on your top bars a couple things tend to happen.

With some bars/guides the some bees ignore the guides and build combs off center on the bars to give more space. When you see that, start sicking in spacers. If you don't, it will be harder to examine and eventually they'll start making combs the span across 2 bars.

Some bees/guides just start making the combs so far they start merging. This mostly happens near the top of the comb. When you pull the comb out to examine it you'll rip some off on the bar next it. This is what happens to me and it's my indication they want to make the comb fatter, but don't have the space. So I stick in spacers and next time I go in for an inspection I'll find the've thickened out the whole comb. If don't stick in spacers then I wind up ripping apart the fat honey cells at the top of the comb every time I inspect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great pics that illustrate the above post. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
With some bars/guides the some bees ignore the guides and build combs off center on the bars to give more space. When you see that, start sicking in spacers.
It's as if you were standing right next to me a few days ago. What you describe is exactly what I saw, and I also inserted 1/4" spacers just as you recommend. The bees started building comb on 3 narrow bars before I recognized what was happening, so I spaced out these bars and started inserting wide bars behind them.

The bees are doing well with 3 combs in the honey area: 1 partially capped, 1 uncapped, and one empty.

I managed to knock one comb off in the process and tied it back on with sisal twine. The bees reattached comb and chewed through the twine in 2 days--AMAZING.
 
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