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I am coming out of my first winter with a hive and wondering when I should start feeding pollen and syrup, I put my ear to the hive at least once a week and this week the buzzing seems to be a little less audible but still there, not sure if it's because they move the cluster durring the warmer days or if the population is dwindling. I am in North eastern CT
 

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You can start feeding pollen any time after winter solstice (December 23rd). So you can start feeding now. Once you start feeding, you have to keep feeding, or the brood will starve and die.

The sooner you start feeding, the faster the hive can build up.

All in all, I would start feeding now if I were you. As a matter of fact, I have started feeding.
 

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It depends on your goals. If you're feeding fondant/heavy syrup/MCM to prevent starvation, a few months ago :). If you're building for spring splits, a couple brood cycles before your main pollen flows. If you want a strong field force for the first honey flow, a couple brood cycles before that.

The main risks (well, not risks so much as be-awares) to spring feeding are swarming and contamination/syrup-bound broodnest. If you feed indiscriminately, the bees could build up quickly and if you're not conscientious can swarm. If you overfeed, they can have syrup stores that may mix with a potential honey crop (contamination). Or they can lay up so much syrup that the queen's ability to lay eggs is hampered due to all the cells being full of syrup. This condition is called being "honeybound" when it's nectar but it probably happens more as being syrup bound from overfeeding.

Check with beeks in your area for when the various flows start; that'll help. And decide what your management goal from feeding is; don't feed for feeding's sake, but with a goal in mind. Goal met, stop feeding.
 
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