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Discussion Starter #1
I've probably read 100 times when do check for eggs after making a split with a queen cell but I can't remember for sure. Is it 20 days after the cell is capped? Is there any need to inspect the nuc prior to 20 days, if 20 days is the correct time? If so, what am I looking for? I guess it would be good to see if the queen cell hatched, but other than that.....? Thanks again for the advice guys. I sometimes maybe many times, forget to say thanks for the advice but I'd be at a loss if not for the help on this forum. I can't imagine trying to learn to keep bees without a local mentor prior to the Internet days.....
 

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http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmath.htm

If you made a split with a queen cell that is about to emerge (usually 10 days after a graft) then she will emerge in two days and should be laying 14 days after that, so 16 days. If you make a walk away split they will start with a 4 day old larva and it will emerge 12 days after than and you can realistically expect eggs 14 days after that, so 26 days (+- one week).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, I'm going to guess that they were slowed down a day or so by an unexpected night time low of 28 degrees. So if the QC's were capped on 4/12, I could expect eggs on 5/2?
 

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Once the queen cells are capped it will be seven days before she hatches out (+/- one day).
Depending on "when you saw" they were capped during that seven day span she would hatch out, anywhere from 4-13 to 4-19.

Check for eggs from 5-1 to 5-7
check for larva from 5-6 to 5-12

It all depends on when the queen cell was capped and at what stage you saw it.
 

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I've been told and it seems to have happened to me that if you go into the nuc too early, the bees may blame the new queen for the disturbance and ball her. Has this happened to you guys and can it be avoided?
 

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last saturday i split my queen into a nuc, leaving the hive to make a new queen . i was going to check tomorrow to make sure they made a queen cell. i don't want to wait 3 more weeks only to find out they are queenless. also if they are on multiple frames, i may pull one to start another nuc.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
A buddy of mine and I both have the same bee genetics and when I made my nucs he had a couple extra swarm cells. I put 2 QC's from one of his hives in one of my splits. I didn't know how long they had been capped, but I did notice the end of the cell looked papery thin on one of them. I checked that nuc this evening and it now has a nice looking, long abdomen laying queen in it. :D (unless she actually rode out of one of my hives on a frame of sealed brood, but I checked.....) Assuming that she's new, that's the first queen I have had hatch out and mate since starting beekeeping last year. The cell must have been in the process of being chewed open when I got it. I figure that's the only way to get a laying queen 15 days after putting the cell in the hive. I feel a sense of accomplishment about having the queen hatch out and get mated, although I did absolutely nothing that contributed to that. LOL
 

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If the cell is ready to hatch in a day or two, you can have a laying queen in 8 days or maybe even less depending on time of year and favorable weather conditions.
 
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