Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,313 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So if I treated this past FALL with OAV when should I be testing the mite loads? I am guessing after the honey flow when the hives are loaded with bees . Seems like testing in the spring is not needed .
Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,558 Posts
In that situation I think I might just haul open and examine some drone brood. That is about where I expect to be come spring. If no mites are showing in the drone brood I think you are close to home free. Your bees must be starting to brood aren't they?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,604 Posts
I would suggest testing in the spring some time during the flow to get a baseline count. Test again in early summer, and again in late summer when the mite population is typically at it's peak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,691 Posts
For every mite you can knock down in the spring, that prevents multiple numbers of mites later in the year, because of their reproduction rate. Perhaps treating in the spring will help reduce the so very large numbers of mites in the late summer and fall. Granted, treating will or may be needed in the late summer/fall also, but perhaps the honey production through spring and summer would be increased with spring treatments as well. I'm not advocating treating or not treating, I'm just saying that if you are one to treat, perhaps both spring and fall treating would give better honey production in the spring and summer, as well as hive over wintering success.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,313 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Your bees must be starting to brood aren't they?
Yes they are I had 2 dead outs and they both had a little brood. So i am sure there starting the make some brood.
I figured I'd test them right before I slap the honey supers on that way if I need to treat them there will be no honey supers on just brood chambers. I can't wait to be in my hives.:D Got 10in new snow last night. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,604 Posts
Ray, very good points.
What I would like to add, for those who use OAV, is that typically the bees seem to stay well ahead of the mites during spring build up and into the flow. Not always, but it's fairly reliable if you have decent stock. The colony getting into trouble seems to be during the dearth in late summer, when brood rearing slows way down and mite loads are at their highest. For the OAV user that is the normal time period to do 3 treatments a week apart to knock down a high percentage of the mites. Then, a clean up treatment when broodless in early winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,486 Posts
I still think it would be prudent to check on mite drops. My strongest hive has had a steady drop all winter after dropping a few hundred in a 48 hr period after two hits of oav in the fall.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top