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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
9 days ago I found a swarm on a fence, I shook them into a nuc and have kept them fed. They have partially drawn out comb on most of the frames (all have foundation) and I see some pollen stores, but no noticable brood. Am I just being impatient? or should I be seeing something by now?

Also, one of the frames had some comb on it, the bees apparently didn't like it and removed all the old wax and have new white comb on half of it. I thought the queen would lay in the old comb, but they spent the first few days on demolition duty. Is that weird or normal?
 

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I have had swarms that took 3 weeks to see brood :(
 

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The bees are excellent judges at what is best for them. Sounds like they are tearing down the old comb and building new, good for them.

It may be a few weeks before the queen is ready to lay eggs. Some of the things to take into consideration would be, depth of the comb, queen settling into her new hive, etc.

Look for tiny white eggs, in the bottom of the cells, dead center. I find it helps to have reading glasses and then turn the comb so that the sun shines down the cell. Once the queen begins laying eggs, it will be three days before the eggs hatch and the larva emerges. Look for little white worms laying in the bottom of the cell in the shape of the letter "C".

Good luck.
 

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A swarm queen is like a queen that you buy. She is slimmed down and not laying. She needs to get back into laying form again. You might find some eggs after about a week, but you should start seeing them at two weeks. Each queen and swarm will be a little different. But I don't get concerned until after two weeks.

This is probably because I try not to bother the swarm for two weeks so I don't actually know when they start. I just check to make sure they have room a couple of days after putting them in a box if it was a large swarm. Then let them do their thing for a couple of weeks. You will probably find brood at that point. If not I would look for the queen to see if you have her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, I guess I'm just impatient. They are building up comb and bringing in lots of pollen, I sat and watched the hive for about an hour this morning, they had lots of white or off white pollen. I will just enjoy them and try not to be so impatient!
 

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Second year bee keeper here and I have yet to see eggs. I chock it up to my old guy eyes, not the bees. The hives here are doing great this year and if I do a full inspection I usually find the queens (2 marked, one not) so I don't worry to much. One of these days I'll pull out the magnifying glass and see if I can find some eggs, but I usually have other things to do. As long as they are acting well and going about the business of beeing bees, then I let them bee bees.:pinch:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Honestly, I haven't seen them on the other hive either, but I figured that I have never really done a "tear down" inpection and taken apart all the boxes and removed lots of frames. Does anyone do that on a regular basis, or only when you think there might be a problem?
 

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Jam, I started a 3 frame nuc about May 7th or so. They built up to 2 mostly full deeps so I put on honey super about a week ago. When I check on them they hadn't started to draw any foundation in super. So I thought maybe they really were not ready for super. I tore the hive down frame by frame and box by box. I found 2 frames in bottom box untouched for the most part and 3 frames in the top box. So I took off the super. I am new this year and have never found a queen when looking. I think I caught a glimse of her on the very middle brood frame but she ran to the other side and when I flipped it over I could not see her. It was a great learning experience. I learn and recognize new things every time I go into a hive. I read these threads as much as I can and the advice that is given is invaluable to a new bk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ha... yea, finding the queen is another thing I haven't done, but when I hived the swarm in the nuc it was really obvious when she was in the hive. One minute they were all charging and flying out, the next minute it all reversed and they charged back in. :D so I knew she was there. Now it would be nice to know she's active and all right.
 
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