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Discussion Starter #1
This morning on my first break at work (9:00) my wife had texted me to facetime her. She was out by the hives and there was a cluster of bees on the north side of one of the hives and lots of bees flying around the north side of the hives which was unusual. I told her it looked like a swarm coming in. I told her to get one of the nuc boxes our original colonies came in and try to get them into it. She did just that successfully. I wasn’t sure it was a swarm and figured if they weren’t they would eventually fly back to their original hive. After work I looked at them and sure enough there was a queen (only saw one) and they had started building comb.

My question is, is this too late for them to survive? We’re in NW Alabama.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Feed like crazy and they may have a chance. I have had mid-September swarms successfully overwinter here in Richmond, VA and you are definitely warmer than I am. I would be checking the hive she came from and making sure the new queen got mated. You may need to combine them back in a few weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the suggestions.


We’re pretty sure they didn’t come from our hives. My wife said they were coming in from the north which is the same direction I saw one come from back in the spring. I’m going Thursday to get a wooden five frame nuc. They’re in cardboard for now. I also have some candy boards and fondant coming. Plus they will get some pollen patty and a frame of brood that has a lot of stores on it.
 

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I say - a nice, fat chance in your whereabouts they'd be OK if this is a true swarm.
Provide them, of course.
 

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6a 3rd yr 5 production hives 1/ 2 q resource hive
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Never too late. Better for you to try then leave it to mother nature. I did it at Greg's encouragement in mid Oct and it worked in a 6a climate. Keep them snug, vertical layout best (like resource hive), tuck them next to a boomer if you have one, feed the living daylights out of them and drop frames of honey over the top if you have spares. You need at least 4 deep frames of honey overhead if it's an 8 frame (4 over 4). Insulate with no dead space. I used only 1/2 of a resource hive and stuffed 1/2 of the other half with pillows, insulation etc. Be prepared with auxiliary feed through winter.
 

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I had a guy call me one year that he had drug in some logs for fire wood, what he did not realize is that one of the logs contained a hive of bees. When he got home and it warmed up there were bees every where. I got the call to come and get a bee tree. By the time I got there we only saw a few bees flying around, the masses had moved out and were clinging on the bottom of the log. Put them in a cardboard box and brought them home. Keep in mind this was in December. Kept them in the garage (45 to 50 degrees) in a five frame nuc with screened top and screen in the entrance. Fed them sugar water and on warm days would sit them outside to fly and bring them back in at night. They were a boomer hive come spring. Lived on the front porch all summer til the new winter.

Never too late!
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Lived on the front porch all summer.
I like the idea of front porch bees, unless I am expecting UPS to drop off my latest order from Mann-Lake. Maybe the back porch?
 
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