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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have pockets of capped honey in 3-4 medium supers that I want to try to get back to my bees during a warm spell we are having here for the next 4-5 days. The frames are sporadically capped and I have already shook the nectar out. It will be in the 70s here until next Wednesday, at which point the temperature will drop to the 40s-50s during the day.

My first thought was to extract the honey and place it into the hive top feeders (dual reservoir with floats style). This method would be more time consuming but maybe easier for the bees to consume and store it?

My second thought was to uncap the frames and place the supers on the hives. I would give them until Tuesday of next week at which point I would pull the supers for good. This method would be quicker at first, but does it take longer for the bees to extract and store the honey this way? Another question would be if the bees would be less likely to move the honey since its already kind of stored in the cells to begin with. If they moved it all I would think they would also clean them up when they were done which would solve that problem too.

Since I am dealing with a limited time frame I am not sure which of these two options would be more effective. The frames are not solid capped honey by any means so I doubt there would be honey raining down in torrents if I scarred them and placed them in a super on top of the hive. I have seen videos of people scarring them and leaving them sideways on top of the hive but I am not sure why this would be better or different from just scarring them and keeping them in a super (unless you only had fewer frames to feed than would fill an entire super).

Any thoughts or advice would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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Is there any flow in your area at the moment? I recently tried to do something similar but the bees did not pull the honey down. I extracted the honey, capped or not, diluted it 50:50 with water and fed it back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is there any flow in your area at the moment? I recently tried to do something similar but the bees did not pull the honey down. I extracted the honey, capped or not, diluted it 50:50 with water and fed it back.
No flow... heading into Winter. I all but taped the hives up for Winter and then we've had a warm spell that started a few days ago and will last till next week. I thought maybe I could get them just a little bit more stores by feeding back this honey.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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you could set the supers out and let them have at it.

then you do NOT need to open and add then open and take boxes on and off.
they may take it all they may not . As it will get cold then for a while the robbing will not continue due to cold.

Only issue may be other folks bees could find it as well, never sure who all is with in the radius.

GG
 

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Only issue may be other folks bees could find it as well, never sure who all is with in the radius.
Not just other folks' bees. When I left some frames out to be cleaned recently, I unintentionally started a massive 'robbing' frenzy from my own two hives that left hundreds upon hundreds of dead bees. This was during my spring mind you, but the flow in my area was just a trickle so they were desperate for the honey.

I'm really not a fan of open feeding.
 

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Set them out in the open away from your hives. 100 yards away, if possible, which should minimize chances for robbing. No need to uncap. I do this every year with wet frames and partially filled and/or capped frames.
 

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There is a literature on placing honey containing supers under the brood nest in the fall, with the reported outcome of the supers being emptied by the bees who will move the honey up to the brood nest, giving a consolidation of the honey where they'll need it. The uncapped honey gets moved faster than capped honey, so if you try this, it might be worthwhile scratching the cappings where needed. It is an approach that Warre apparently advocated for based upon careful observation of bee behavior. (I top super during a flow, but I took note of this when I read about it...if the bees will do as they're reported to do in this situation, it would be great for those few partially filled supers that aren't worth extracting in the fall).

The disadvantage...you need to move the heavier supers twice...once to place the supers below the brood nest, and once to remove them.

To read more, look for 'nadiring supers'. I've seen it more commonly in discussion groups centered in Great Britain.
 

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6a 4th yr 9 colonies inc. 2 resource hives
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6a In my part of the world we are past the window of what you want to do. Just not enough time. However what I would do is be sure all hives are up to weight, switch out frames with your inventory if they are fuller and keep the rest in an emergency tote. I run a med, deep, med winter config. If you want to get more feed in I would put mountain camp on over wax paper or newspaper and spritz it with water (not too much) to create a slurry. I do that all winter when its too cold for them to take liquid feed.
 

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My second thought was to uncap the frames and place the supers on the hives.
Do this.
A no-brainer to me - I would do exactly that.

Be sure to set the frames from the nest as far as possible - like insert an empty super in between the nest and the uncapped frames.
Also can use a soft cover to separate out the frames to be dried.
Just install them the above (no need to kill yourself and the bees lifting heavy boxes so you can slide the frames under).
 

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There is a literature on placing honey containing supers under the brood nest in the fall, with the reported outcome of the supers being emptied by the bees who will move the honey up to the brood nest, giving a consolidation of the honey where they'll need it. The uncapped honey gets moved faster than capped honey, so if you try this, it might be worthwhile scratching the cappings where needed. It is an approach that Warre apparently advocated for based upon careful observation of bee behavior. (I top super during a flow, but I took note of this when I read about it...if the bees will do as they're reported to do in this situation, it would be great for those few partially filled supers that aren't worth extracting in the fall).

The disadvantage...you need to move the heavier supers twice...once to place the supers below the brood nest, and once to remove them.

To read more, look for 'nadiring supers'. I've seen it more commonly in discussion groups centered in Great Britain.
I wish I had seen this post last autumn. There was lots of uncapped honey. I am still learning, didn't know what to do, so I left it all in the hive, in 3 boxes.
In spring, there was lots of capped honey (worth 6-7 full frames), but the colony was failing. Still working on it.
 
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