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I have been contacted by two different folks that have bees in the walls of their home, right next to the chimney. Getting the bees out of the house would involve going through the bricks and mortar. Neither of them wants me to go through the sheetrock on the interior of the home.

What would you charge to do a cutout on bricks and mortar?

It would also involve traveling to the next town over about 35 miles away, one way.

Thanks to everyone in advance for your thoughts.
 

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I wouldn't do it if I had to go through bricks and mortar, I would wait until an easier cutout comes along, none of them are that easy though. John
 

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through brick and mortar, I wouldn't do it. I'm not a mason. if you mes sit up what will they do? sue you because they weren't bright enough to take the easy route through drywall?

Not enough money.

Big Bear
 

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The second you cut through the base of that chimney (any part of it), the whole structure is compromised and has the potential to become really unstable. I wouldn't want the people calling me up after their chimney falls..............on their house.

I wouldn't touch that for anything.
 

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The above posts are correct. Damage to drywall is much easier and substantially cheaper to repair than damage to bricks and mortar.

You just repair the drywall and paint over it and you can't see any evidence of the damage. Repairs to brick and mortar are always visible.
 

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If you would have to go through the brick from the outside, what makes you think you wouldn't from the inside? If you have to get into the chimney, them outside is better. Then you don't need to fix the sheet rock. Seems to be too much work.
 

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Galaxy is correct. I've been in construction for the last 35 years, and a general contractor for 25. I like doing cutouts, but if it is behind masonry, you need to do it from the inside through the drywall, or walk away. Masonry work is expensive and time consuming, and in many cases difficult to match, especially on older homes. Drywall removal is easy and relatively cheap, especially if you can seal the room off.

Good luck, Richard
 

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I have been contacted by two different folks that have bees in the walls of their home, right next to the chimney. Getting the bees out of the house would involve going through the bricks and mortar. Neither of them wants me to go through the sheetrock on the interior of the home.

What would you charge to do a cutout on bricks and mortar?

It would also involve traveling to the next town over about 35 miles away, one way.

Thanks to everyone in advance for your thoughts.
The bees have not compromised the chimney, so why would you?
Sheet rock is cheap and easy to repair.

You are the professional, have them do it your way or walk away.
Save youself the grief later.
There are folks you just cannot help.

BM
 

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I posted about a cutout I was up in the air over, but the owner wanted to do a trapout, and not cut into the house. I didn't want to do it based on time, and location (neighborhood was very shady). As I am chewing on the issue, I got a phone call from a co-worker; a tree limb had come down in their yard, and it's full of bees. I'm goin' tomorrow to cut it out. Easier jobs comb along.

An option for you as for price, give em one for drywall, and one for masonry work. Make the drywall quote fair, and the one for the masonry 'through the roof.':rolleyes:

Figure in the fuel cost, too.
 

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As you can tell from everyone's response so far, if you're going to tackle the job, go from the interior. From my experiences, that's your best bet on removing all the comb and thus eliminating the problem. I tell the home owner that if he has them sprayed, the remaining honey comb is still a rodent attractant and fire hazard...their choice.

As far as what to charge, it usually is a two day affair no matter how I do it when I consider the time to collect up my gear, drive to the site a couple times, clean up my gear, and putting it away, so I charge what I can make working my regular job for at least 2 days, plus a difficulty surcharge (be it the extraction or the customer!)

I use to feel guilty charging $500+ until I found out that it cost more for an exterminator!
 

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Agreed with everyone. WALK AWAY. I have walked away from a few stucco homes for the same reasons. To cut thru the stucco would kick up a ton of dust, plus probably cause the bees breathing issues or possibly kill them all together and also cause you lung problems as well for years down the road. Stucco is hard to patch and match and may even start to leak. Bricks can cause all those same problems. I had a guy that wanted me to do a stucco home, 2nd story trap out in a very difficuilt place other than go thru simple dry wall. I walked away from it for a few reasons and have not looked back. Easier jobs will be had. Heck, bees in a 5 gallon bucket and $100 in my pocket, doesn't get much easier.

C2
 

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I have a concrete and masonry company and have been doing it for almost 30 years.I am new to bee keeping, but I wouldn't cut a hole in the bottom half of the chimney unless it is very small. You will not make the brick match . If you do cut a small hole and can't get the bees you will have wasted alot of time and the owner will not be happy.
 

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I'd tell them that if they want me to remove the bees from the chimney side, they need to have the chimney removed first.

After the chimney has been removed, $100 an hour labor, $250 minimum fee, and they are responsible for all repairs and damages. (plus any extra $$ for drive time if you want that also.)

Once they price having the chimney removed and a new one put up, they may decide they like the idea of going through the drywall instead.
 

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What would I charge? More than they would be willing to pay. And if they wanted to talk about it, then maybe, I would back off on the price.
 

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I would try the trapout method. I currently have one going on a house that the bees are behind the chimney. I've had to go out a couple of times to seal it up as the bees found new ways out. Went by there yesterday and they are all coming out of the cone. :)
 

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Just for the fun of it? Or what? Certainly you aren't profitting from this venture. Are you spencer? Other than perhaps in nonmonetary ways.
 
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