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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let's just create a single list already - these questions keep coming up over and over (and over).
Feel free to append or challenge anything.

These are the things that attract the swarms.
No particular order.
Don't ask for any scientific support - I will not be looking for it. :)
---------------------------------------------------

- used hives (the older and better propolised the better; well used nucs are about perfect due to mobility)

- used old comb in the trap (the darker the better; moth damage, mold, bee poop, etc are fine; can also have old combs placed next to the trap)

- used old frames (the more gunk and propolis the better even if no comb in the frames)

- propolis tincture applied to the insides of a new/unused trap

- well propolised fabric (e.g. old propolised burlap; use it as a frame soft cover OR staple to the trap outside)

- lemon grass oil aka LGO (applied to the trap internals; reportedly both Cymobopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon citratus work)

- "Swarm Commander" (TM) (applied to the trap internals)

- old queens (kept in the alcohol; the alcohol-based "queen juice" can be applied to the trap internals/entrance)

- active hive(s) near the swarm trap (these always give away a scent plume to attract the scouts)

Notes:

- the chemical lure with strong scent (LGO/Swarm Commander) can be also placed near/above the trap so that the scent blows about farther away and brings the bees to the trap from longer distance

- since all my traps are very well used, I never place any chemical lures inside anymore (no need) - instead, I attach a zip bag with LGO to the trap's side OR few feet above/near the trap - this way the scent blows about better; I use a drop of LGO onto the paper towel or a saturated Q-tip and zip it; the zip bag has a single, tiny puncture to it

- last year the first time I tried the "queen juice", I rubbed it into/near the trap entrances - whatever is the case, but the last season was my best trapping season so far

- last year also (rather accidentally) I set out supers with old frames onto the sunny back porch so to mitigate the moths - but the same porch is also my swarm trapping location - turns out these old frames, when hit by sun and wind attract lots and lots of bees from around the vicinity (a very good thing when trapping) - the last season was the most productive for the porch so far
 

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From my own experience and what I’ve heard from several others, LGO can force the bees outside of the trap. I have had this happen especially when a swarm moves in right after the trap was baited. I like your idea of not putting bait inside the trap.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I do like Greg and put the majority of the LGO (1 Q-Tip swab) on the OUTSIDE of the swarm trap and use the barest minimum on a topbar of a frame on the inside. On a warm day, even I can smell the trap from 20-30 feet away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, when you already have well used and propolised traps, the LGO is only needed to spread the "net" as far away as possible. Once the scouts zero in onto the target, the LGO is no longer a major factor, IF you just hang it on a branch above the trap.
 

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Let's just create a single list already - these questions keep coming up over and over (and over).
Feel free to append or challenge anything.

These are the things that attract the swarms.
No particular order.
Don't ask for any scientific support - I will not be looking for it. :)
---------------------------------------------------

- used hives (the older and better propolised the better; well used nucs are about perfect due to mobility)

- used old comb in the trap (the darker the better; moth damage, mold, bee poop, etc are fine; can also have old combs placed next to the trap)

- used old frames (the more gunk and propolis the better even if no comb in the frames)

- propolis tincture applied to the insides of a new/unused trap

- well propolised fabric (e.g. old propolised burlap; use it as a frame soft cover OR staple to the trap outside)

- lemon grass oil aka LGO (applied to the trap internals; reportedly both Cymobopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon citratus work)

- "Swarm Commander" (TM) (applied to the trap internals)

- old queens (kept in the alcohol; the alcohol-based "queen juice" can be applied to the trap internals/entrance)

- active hive(s) near the swarm trap (these always give away a scent plume to attract the scouts)

Notes:

- the chemical lure with strong scent (LGO/Swarm Commander) can be also placed near/above the trap so that the scent blows about farther away and brings the bees to the trap from longer distance

- since all my traps are very well used, I never place any chemical lures inside anymore (no need) - instead, I attach a zip bag with LGO to the trap's side OR few feet above/near the trap - this way the scent blows about better; I use a drop of LGO onto the paper towel or a saturated Q-tip and zip it; the zip bag has a single, tiny puncture to it

- last year the first time I tried the "queen juice", I rubbed it into/near the trap entrances - whatever is the case, but the last season was my best trapping season so far

- last year also (rather accidentally) I set out supers with old frames onto the sunny back porch so to mitigate the moths - but the same porch is also my swarm trapping location - turns out these old frames, when hit by sun and wind attract lots and lots of bees from around the vicinity (a very good thing when trapping) - the last season was the most productive for the porch so far
I Australia exposing old comb is not legal - An American Foulbrood issue.
I use LG oil as many have suggested - just a little
 
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Let's just create a single list already - these questions keep coming up over and over (and over).
Feel free to append or challenge anything.

These are the things that attract the swarms.
No particular order.
Don't ask for any scientific support - I will not be looking for it. :)
---------------------------------------------------

- used hives (the older and better propolised the better; well used nucs are about perfect due to mobility)

- used old comb in the trap (the darker the better; moth damage, mold, bee poop, etc are fine; can also have old combs placed next to the trap)

- used old frames (the more gunk and propolis the better even if no comb in the frames)

- propolis tincture applied to the insides of a new/unused trap

- well propolised fabric (e.g. old propolised burlap; use it as a frame soft cover OR staple to the trap outside)

- lemon grass oil aka LGO (applied to the trap internals; reportedly both Cymobopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon citratus work)

- "Swarm Commander" (TM) (applied to the trap internals)

- old queens (kept in the alcohol; the alcohol-based "queen juice" can be applied to the trap internals/entrance)

- active hive(s) near the swarm trap (these always give away a scent plume to attract the scouts)

Notes:

- the chemical lure with strong scent (LGO/Swarm Commander) can be also placed near/above the trap so that the scent blows about farther away and brings the bees to the trap from longer distance

- since all my traps are very well used, I never place any chemical lures inside anymore (no need) - instead, I attach a zip bag with LGO to the trap's side OR few feet above/near the trap - this way the scent blows about better; I use a drop of LGO onto the paper towel or a saturated Q-tip and zip it; the zip bag has a single, tiny puncture to it

- last year the first time I tried the "queen juice", I rubbed it into/near the trap entrances - whatever is the case, but the last season was my best trapping season so far

- last year also (rather accidentally) I set out supers with old frames onto the sunny back porch so to mitigate the moths - but the same porch is also my swarm trapping location - turns out these old frames, when hit by sun and wind attract lots and lots of bees from around the vicinity (a very good thing when trapping) - the last season was the most productive for the porch so far
Anise oil works as well.
 

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I do a lot of cut outs and after some time render down the wax. There is usually a bunch of propolis in the left over mess. Scout bees are very much attracted to this. Smear it inside and outside of the bait hive. No need to just throw it out, put it to good use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So here I did a demo to show that the "queen juice" actually works.

3 pictures attached.
1) I had a Q-tip soaked in the "queen juice" attached to my trap. A swarm just moved in and you can see few bees around the tip.
2) I took the Q-tip away so I can use it on my new trap short distance away (now that the current one is taken). See how bees congregate around the Q-tip spot. Clearly, this is not a random congregation but at the exact spot with the "queen juice" smell.
3) The same spot zoomed in.

So the juice works.
I don't know if bees can pick it up from a distance, like LGO or SC or heated propolis.
But once the trap has been found, the juice demonstrably attracts bees to it.
So keep them dead queens in a bottle with alcohol and use for trap baiting.
 

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