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One of my hives was struggling this spring so I requeened it. During the summer its numbers never really grew as large as I wanted, but I always found brood and eggs along with honey stores. I checked the hive a month ago and I knew it didn't have enough honey for the winter, but I went out yesterday to check them and the entire hive had died, apparently due to a brief cold snap. The hive did not have a single cell of honey. I am somewhat perplexed at how it is possible that the hive did not have any honey at all. Do you have any ideas as to what would cause this?
 

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The hive has been robbed out by other bees. Easy to happen to a weak hive when the nectar flow slows or stops.
 

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You also never mentioned about feeding! Its always best to help a weak hive by feeding them until they have the hive bodies drawn out. Which here in ky we most generally use 2 deep hive bodies! Its always best to feed while they are building up the hive bodies and always best to keep the entrance reduced until the population is larger to guard & protect the hive. Hope this helps!
 

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Sound like starvation. Winter is not the only season for bees to starve. They were either robbed of they consumed it all. A good rule of thumb is a hives will consume 1 frame of honey and 1 frame of pollen for each frame of brood raised. The hive responds to food available. If they dont hae enough to raise lots of brood then they wont.

The most successful beekeepers identify problems will before symptoms appear. When you saw they were light that was the time to feed. If feed early enough they should have drawn all the frames and raised more brood.

Dont sweat it. We all learn though experience.
 

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Yeah, it happened to me too. Could kick myself because the hive was doing pretty well coming out of Summer. Then I had something knock the cover askew, and the bees got soaked. I should have started feeding them and reduced the entrance as soon as I noticed, but I decided to wait a week. By then, the only activity in the hive were bees from a neighboring colony robbing the last of their supplies.
 
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