Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am a new beekeeper, and my two beehives will arrive tomorrow. Just wondering what type of foundation I should put down. Should I put down a pallet, landscaping blocks, cinder blocks, or any other foundations that any of you use.
Note; I did not purchase a hive stand for my hives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
I am a new beekeeper, and my two beehives will arrive tomorrow. Just wondering what type of foundation I should put down. Should I put down a pallet, landscaping blocks, cinder blocks, or any other foundations that any of you use.
Note; I did not purchase a hive stand for my hives.
I think it would be very difficult to affix cinderblock to the frames, and I'm not sure that bees would draw comb on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
pay no attention to the last post. it shure seems like some sort of a game with some poeple to see how much fun you can have with a newbie befor you run them off........ i use cinder blocks for now. thay work fine. i am in the process of putting poles in the ground and running boards between them to set my hives on. the only problem i see with pallets is that thay may have chemicals in them and thay wont last as long as some other materiels. is the ground level where you want to put them? if not use a shovel and a level to get your "foundation" for the hive to set on good an level. keep you head up and dont pay attention to the things that some people say. please check your pm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I get used railroad ties, cut them 2" wider than the hive, use them...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
Use what will work for you. having a hive stand is not needed. just put the hives about 4-6 iinches above ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
around here in Texas, I would prefer a hivestand with legs that can be done in a way to prevent ant entry into the hives.

Fire ants, pharoah ants, carpenter ants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
I have been using cinderblocks, mainly because there is a giant pile of them in the old pasture behind the house. Once everything is level and settles a bit it seems to be a rock solid base, I've been pretty happy with them. Especially since they are simple and free. I like the idea of railroad ties, too. In my area CN leaves hundreds of them laying around in piles beside the rails. I think they give the old ones away for free if you ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
beware of replying to the origional poster. i sent him a pm sugesting another websight forum he might try that is great for beeginers and he sent me a pm thretening to report me for spam... lol that is funny... fire away mr. spock i appoligise
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks everyone for all of the help.

@11x-I read my pm before I looked to see who posted under my thread. I thought it was a mass message sent out to a lot of people. So I just told you not to send it to me again. My mistake. ;)
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,108 Posts
Proper terminology will get you better answers. In beekeeping, "foundation" is the sheets of wax (or plastic) that the bees build comb on. "Stand" is the thing that the bottom boards are put on top of to set up a hive.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top