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What tools do you use to do a cutout? I will be doing one very soon and was wondering if there were any special tools other than power saws, crow bars, hammers, etc.

I'm pretty certain the bees will be in full fight mode when I start sawing on their home.
 

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DON'T cut any structural materials like wall studs, beams, trusses, floor joists, or anything else like that. Just cut sheathing and try not to nick any of the structural components.

JoeMcc
 

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You're asking a question that it's impossible to give an answer to!

We haven't seen the job. You haven't posted pictures. We don't know what equipment is available to you to use, let alone what equipment you have. We don't know the temperament of the bees. We don't know the restrictions of the homeowner or the building manager. We don't know the building materials. We don't know how high up, how large of a comb, or how long they've been there. We don't know you're expertise. (This can go on and on and on...)

Are you getting the picture?


You probably already know you need the basics:
Protective equipment, equipment to place the bees in, equipment to place the comb and honey in, and equipment to clean up the job site, including stray bees and dripped honey.

Which is too vague of an answer, and not what you're looking for, I'm sure.


A better answer might have been, "What ever it takes to do the job." I've even employed a fireplace poker on a job in the past.

Good luck,
DS
 

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Try your hardest to pull things apart in a way that will be easily repaired. Cutting out many small pieces of someone's siding is not good. It's often better to cut out a bit more than you think you need to. The less pieces the better generally. It is good to have some knowledge of the type of structure you are tearing down, so you know how it may be repaired.

As for tools, make sure you have something to cut the comb out with. Also, insulation of some sort for filling walls is good, plus caulk or expanding foam to block any holes and fill the space so bees won't find it inviting to move back in. Look for alternate holes that may be used to get into the same space and block them as well.
 

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I try to visualize what I will be doing step be step and what I need, then bring anything else that might come in handy. You should have some "folding" frames to put comb in. I had one where the comb was in as far as I could reach my arm. A serrated knife taped to a pc or wood for an extension was the only way I was able to cut it. On that one. as I was sawzall-ing the soffit open, the bees just went on their merry way and payed no attention to me. I expected more resistance.
 

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I have found a long filet knife (9 inches or so) to be very handy for cutting comb. A piece of cardboard to lay the comb on if you have to carry it very far before putting it in frames. For frames, I use some folding catch frames I made, or wired frames (no foundation) with rubber bands. If you do a search on here you will find a lot of info on cut outs. Good luck, and have fun.
 

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I know you mentioned crow bar but having been in the trades for many years and doing a few cutouts I would not go without my Vaughn Super Bar. It is an oversize flat prybar that slips under siding and lifts without doing much damage at all. It also works well to remove comb. I keep mine sharpened to a fine edge. It's kinda like a hive tool on steroids.;)
 

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The cutouts I have done were mainly in bee trees that had been cut down.

I take:

2 deep boxes, 20 foundationless frames, bottom board, and lid.
Duct tape.
Rubber bands.
Box of nitrile gloves.
Serrated bread knife with 9" blade. (My uncapping knife during honey extraction.)
Jug/pail of water to deal with honey covered hands and tools.
Chainsaw, pry bars, etc. (Whatever woodworking tools you need.)

A bee vac is optional. I don't have one, so I don't use one. I make sure the queen is in the box, and then I leave the hive box there until nightfall to catch all the returning bees.

A companion to help you is a big benefit. 4 hands work a lot better than 2 hands to hold a piece of bee covered brood comb, hold a foundationless frame, and then put rubber bands on the frame to hold the comb in place.
 

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As all above.

Except I use a hammer to bust the sheetrock at the location. Head of the hammer makes a small hole and you can adjust the area as you go and then use the claw end .
 

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That is rather destructive. A drywall saw or keyhole saw is rather cheap and you can save the sheetrock to either put back in the hole, or for the person repairing the damage you do to put back in the hole.

Even if you're not repairing the damage, there is no reason to make more work for someone else. More work usually means more money.
 

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Sheetrock is cheap and easy to replace, removing across studs is not so easy without breaking into small ragged pieces.
Removing as much material from inside the wall that has residue from the hive on it the easier to seal up the odors that will attract bees and other pests to the site.

Goodluck
 

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You frankly should not be doing any cut-outs as you are a beginner and do not really understand what you are doing. It is also illegal without a license. You are going to make a mess.
 

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my god ...... take a stud finder and locate the studs the take a RAZER knife to the center of the studs - this is so that you just cut the dryway inbetween the studs - then cut it into about 2-3 tall sections the slowly pry the piece out from the top first - working down

then use a bee vac to suck up the workers - also tape off the room so bees dont go into the rest of the house -

this can be done in the dark using a red light as the bees will not take flight -

but please ACT LIKE A PROFESSIONAL otherwise the next honeybee nest will go to the spray first ask questions later exterminater !!!

the when you have all of the comb out - take two shorter 2x4 -or 2x6's
and nail them to the existing studs one on each side of where the hive was
this gives you a new screwing area when you go to put the drywall back on.
BUT FIRST - cover the enternce hole and put insulation in the void

id leave it at this point - since i hate mudding! but take the time to have drywall conctactors called or give the home owner a few numbers to call

remember word of mouth is the cheapest advertisement -
 

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I have used knives, chisels and I have used hammers. In some places it was all I could do to get to the bees using a hammer.

I have been on a roof removing bees from a dormar where the roof was so steep I almost slid off the house several times. Ended up eye bolting myself to the studs in the dormar to keep from getting hurt and still couldn't work very well.

(That job I only charged $100 because I wanted to help out a family that was having a hard time.)

I have broken sheetrock with a hammer and not torn up the sheetrock. Just the area I wanted to access.

I try to stay in the middle on things and give everyone the benefit of the doubt. But some think that they are the only ones that can do it right or know what tools must be used in every situation and that it's not possible for someone to do the same job using a different tool and getting the same results.

That's all I am going to say.
 

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Mythomane,

My "cut-outs" right now consist of going through walls of old, abandoned homesteads where the old farmer has given me permission. Do I need a license to tear into an abandoned homestead house?

You know the kind of house I'm talking about, the kind with few or no windows, doors are strictly an option, owls are predictably in residence along with the mice and rats. No paint since who knows when, no electricity, no running water, not livable by any stretch of the imagination.
 

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Hey, good luck. Tips and tricks can be learned by reading up a bit on the subject. There are many primary sources that will flesh out the details for you on cut-outs. Knowing you have never kept bees before, let me (gently) suggest that you may want to get your feet wet first before you tackle something like that.
 
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