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Hello everyone,

Can you please give me ideas on how to and where to store frames after I spin and extract the honey? Also, do I need to scrape off all the wax that stays on the frames after extraction or keep it for bees to rebuild on it next year.

Also Do I need to put the frames in the deep freezer in order to prevent any possibility of spoilage or do I need to keep it out in the open air to dry it as much as possible, but again, wouldn't that attract bees and wasps,...

Thank you very much everyone!
 

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After extraction, put them back on the hive and the bees will lick them clean in a couple days. Save the cleaned frames and leave the comb on (very important) and save them for next spring to give the bees a jump on the early nectar flows. I've been told by everyone that comb is gold-don't waste it!!!

If you have a spare refrigerator or room in your kitchen, free the frames for a couple days which will kill off any beetles or wax moth larvae. Thaw them out and store either in a garbage bag or in vented storage. The beetles and moths shouldn't attack honey comb but take the extra steps.
 

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After the bees have licked them clean freeze them and then store them in clear plastic tubs. If all the frames going into a tub had only honey and no pollen and have never had brood in them then you can just store them. If you store frames that have protein sources (pollen or former brood comb) then freeze them first to kill any mother larvae.

Click picture.



You can find them at Home Depot or Walmart. They hold 22 super frames, or 10 deep and 12 medium frames. The lids snap tight keeping insects out. They are stackable. The clear plastic lets you see what is inside.

Take a frame with you to the store and you'll find something that works - just make sure it has a latching lid that will stay tight even when stacked. They are not ideal for large scale beekeeping but for a hobbyist who needs something for the garage they work well.
 

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Good advice above. I would just add that if you have a decent flow on when wets are put back on hives for clean up, they may fill them instead of cleaning them. Make sure any upper entrance is closed including notch. If they start filling, put an empty box between brood boxes and supers. Also, some report that wax moths will invade honey combs. To be safe, I spray mine with BT. J
 

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IMO - question was - storage supers and frames after season. What I do - after extracting wet frame returned to super then carefully packed in contractors black garbage bags. Additionally before closing bags VERY tightly i trow inside few bay leaves (old East European way to keep wax moth out). In spring (beginning of flow) these wet frames working like magnets for bees (even Queen excluder isn't problem). They are stored in shed, every one marked with hive number.
 

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I do not understand how all you people get such DIRTY supers that need cleaned! As mine come out of the extracter I spray them with zentari aizawa strain BT and stack them tightly to keep mice out. The BT prevents wax moth damage. Then when next spring or summer honey flow starts. I put fragrant combs wet with last years honey on above excluders. The bees race into them and repair damage and fill them with next years promise. Guess my honey isnt dirty.
 
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