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Long story short, the hives are still heavy. What do I do with this extra honey? It's a mixture of sugar, and honey - so I can't eat it or sell it.

I haven't been inside the hives, but the weight was impressive - at least a full super of sugar/honey in every hive remaining.

PS - "sort of" annoyed that I spent that $$ on sugar syrup that wasn't necessary.
 

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I have frozen mine and saved them for splits, or late summer/fall.

I think you "hedged your bet", cost of sugar vs lost hive to lack of food.
 

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In our part of the world, we are just now coming into the period where they eat a lot. A second full of honey and pollen today will turn into a box of brood and bees over the next 4 weeks.
 

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Why is it "bad" to eat or use for cooking? Non-organic treatments? I also noticed this once but also noticed all the capped honey was dark. I could not find a "clear" or light golden honey. It is all inverted sucrose. This problem drove me to standardize a brood chamber arrangment for all seasons. If the is honey in there now, the brood section, it stays there so do not have to fill it with Spring honey. Thus a return on investment!

I wonder what it means, a warm winter ( or insualted hive) results higher hive activities means more bee activity and consumption. I do not see that kind of resultant here. My mean consumption for nine hives over 4 months is 42.6 lb. with a high of 60 lb. and a low of 25 lb. High and low are both Sakatraz queens. One is a big 2 year old queen / colony and the other was a wintered over summer built-up nuc wintering in my standard hive configuration. Guess which one was the big eater ( she also found the first pollen already)? No additional feeding all winter but I may feed syrup soon before the spring flow if they will take it.
 
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