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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I lost a couple of hives last year. Only a few dead bees, no signs of disease, pretty sure they left.

Now I have a lot of frames with different things in the cells that I'm trying to figure out what to do with. They've been frozen.

There are cells with capped honey, capped brood, dried out pollen, pollen with mold on it, fermented uncapped nectar, and some damage from hive beetles / wax moths.

The frames are mostly empty with few cells of the above. So what should I do with these? Is everything ok to put back in the brood boxes of a new hive? Will the bees clean out the bad pollen, capped dead brood, hive beetle poop, and wax moth damage?

Thanks!
 

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Freezing is always good to kill wax moth and shb eggs. Prudent thing to do. Then bag them in good black trash bags and put them out of the way of you and rodents. Some folks fumigate with acetic acid--which is vinegar, I don't and never have a problem. Best thing to do is put bees back on the equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Vance.

Are all those different types of cells fine to put back in a hive as is? That's more what I'm wondering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
To be clear, even with moldy pollen and capped dead brood and SHB poop the bees will clean it out and reuse the frames?

What about the fermented uncapped nectar? Will they remove that?
 

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Long as the hive is strong and healthy they will clean up fermented nectar.

Pollen gone bad can be more difficult, if there is a lot of it, scraping just the pollen cells only, down to the foundation can help the bees clean it.
 

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Pollen gone bad can be more difficult, if there is a lot of it, scraping just the pollen cells only, down to the foundation can help the bees clean it.
Yes - dried-out pollen is the worst. The bees can't easily remove that hardened 'bee-bread', and so they carve away the wax (back down to the mid-rib), allowing the dried pollen pellet to fall down to the hive floor. Then they rebuild that section of comb.
LJ
 
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