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New member and 3rd year of beekeeping in NW Illinois - 1 hive. First year had weak colony and hive raided - all bees and honey gone. Second year (last year) - stronger colony - filled 2nd deep super with mostly honey but did not even start to build out on medium super. Late summer wanted to harvest some honey so took it from the 2nd deep super. I put it back on about the time the goldenrod was blooming. They immediately refilled it with honey and I left it for them for the winter. The polar vortex wiped out my colony this winter. So, I installed new colony this year and started with a 2nd deep super full of honey and immediately put on a medium super. Colony this year is strong. They filled the medium super with honey and I added a second. Last weekend (I can only visit the hive on weekends), they had capped the first medium super but had not touched the second medium super. I harvested all of the capped frames in the first medium super. All this year, I haven't touched the second deep super full of goldenrod honey from last year. Finally to my question - what should I do with that deep super full on goldenrod honey? Just leave it for them this winter? I've read that goldenrod honey is not that good for eating/selling. What are the bees doing all this year with that second deep super that was full of last year's honey? Should the second deep super ever be harvested? I'm trying to figure out this whole thing on my own and don't have anyone experienced I can talk this stuff through with. Any advice would be appreciated.
Brad
 

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...... I've read that goldenrod honey is not that good for eating/selling. .......Brad
Says who?
Gimme that and I will eat it all up (and the kids will join in).
If anything I keep ALL the goldenrod to myself.

Well, since this is the last year honey, I would let the bees reprocess it first.
 

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Says who?
Gimme that and I will eat it all up (and the kids will join in).
If anything I keep ALL the goldenrod to myself.

Well, since this is the last year honey, I would let the bees reprocess it first.
Regardless of what you want to do - get the honey to yourself (I would) OR leave it to the bees - keep in mind that it is likely partially crystallized now.
So it is not as great for wintering as-is or extracting as-is.

To reprocess the honey - uncap those frames (I would do it directly over the hive - dump the cappings and all in); spray the frames liberally with drinking-grade water; put them back (the same place is fine).
The bees will cleanup the mess and move some of the honey to where they want it.
Check back in few days and if any crystallized honey still in place - spray in more water into those cells and let the bees to work some more.
Eventually, they will reprocess the honey, mix it with some fresh nectar, and will store it where they want it - as good as fresh (it is basically fresh after they suck it in and spit it back out).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Greg - appreciate the advice. Excuse my ignorance, but when you say to "do it directly over the hive - dump the cappings and all in" do literally mean to leave the box in place, lift a frame, uncap the honey letting the capping fall where it may (on top of the frames and/or down to the top of the frames of the brood box) then put frame back in place? I'm going out to the hive tomorrow and want to make sure I understand and follow advice correctly.
Thanks - Brad.
 

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Thanks Greg ...... to leave the box in place, lift a frame, uncap the honey letting the capping fall where it may ........
Thanks - Brad.
Yep.
Or scrape using a fork - but it is slower, but less messy maybe.
Or scrape using the knife's edge - less cappings to drop.
The goal to uncap the honey with the least possible residue.
That is what I do and don't worry too much.

If you want - optionally insert a paper towel so you will be dropping cappings onto it - fewer sticky/drowned bees - they will remove the paper when they clean.
Few bees will probably drown IF you really dump a lot of honey - so don't dump A LOT of honey (as least as possible best) - use your judgement..

IF this is a dearth situation - do it fast and only 2-3 frames at a time and close it all up OR probably should not be even doing it.
IF flow is good - can do up to the entire box and let them clean the mess - they will.
Again, use your judgment to NOT drown the entire hive - this is not what you want, of course.
:)
 

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Says who?
Gimme that and I will eat it all up (and the kids will join in).
If anything I keep ALL the goldenrod to myself.

Well, since this is the last year honey, I would let the bees reprocess it first.
My kids prefer the golden rod too. They say it’s stronger
 

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My kids prefer the golden rod too. They say it’s stronger
Indeed.
It has a real flavor to it (not flavor-less generic honey from wherever).
I here joke of the sweaty socks smell in September - it is a good sign to maybe having some goldenrod honey.
 

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Gave a bottle of Golden Rod honey to a good friend who loves honey. He said it was the best he ever had. But i was wondering it seemed to crystalize quicker then other honey. His didn't because he ate it so fast but some i kept for myself did. Is there any truth to this? It was one of the first extractions i ever did . Ran it through the same filters as i did other honey.

The real reason i am asking is it will be blooming soon around me and didnt want to extract a lot and sell honey to customers that crystalizes really fast.
 

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Gave a bottle of Golden Rod honey to a good friend who loves honey. He said it was the best he ever had. But i was wondering it seemed to crystalize quicker then other honey. His didn't because he ate it so fast but some i kept for myself did. Is there any truth to this? It was one of the first extractions i ever did . Ran it through the same filters as i did other honey.

The real reason i am asking is it will be blooming soon around me and didnt want to extract a lot and sell honey to customers that crystalizes really fast.
Most honeys from Aster family flowers crystallize more quickly than average (Goldenrod and Sunflowers are good example).
This is one reason these are not the best honeys to winter on (clover honey types are better to winter on).
So - if possible to get the Goldenrod honey for yourself - it is only better for both - bees and people.
Of course, many (most?) beeks do the opposite - extract clover honey and leave goldenrod honey to the bees (more convenient).
 

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Most honeys from Aster family flowers crystallize more quickly than average (Goldenrod and Sunflowers are good example).
This is one reason these are not the best honeys to winter on (clover honey types are better to winter on).
So - if possible to get the Goldenrod honey for yourself - it is only better for both - bees and people.
Of course, many (most?) beeks do the opposite - extract clover honey and leave goldenrod honey to the bees (more convenient).
.

Great info thanks. So do beeks sell Goldenrod? Never saw it in stores
 

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Two winters ago I left a super of capped GR honey on a hive. Thought the bees would open it and eat it over the winter, I was wrong. Figured it would be somewhat crystallized, but when I uncapped it, it was fine. I went ahead and bottled it for sale. My honor stand customers gave it great feedback. I did make sure to label it as fall honey on the cap so they knew what they were getting.
 
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