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I got a call this evening,lady has a hive in her back yard that was swarming.

I got there too late for the swarm but she says to take the five year old hive,she didn't want it around.
It is inside an upside down galvanized wash tub in the deep shade of a tree.

I threw a net on it and could barely lift it onto the tail gate. Slid it part way on and looked up into it.
Good strong hive.

So right now it is in the truck. Tomorrow will be hot so I have to find it some shade.

So what do I do with it?
I don't want to have the thing over my head and work on it. If I tilt it the comb will break apart.
I am thinking of setting it on plywood with holes down to a hive box below.

Trouble is that the tub is plenty large,I don't think the queen will ever run out of room and go down to the hive box.
 

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I would probably cut it in half with an angle grinder and open it up.
 

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If this hive is 5 years old, the comb in it should be well hardened by now with exception to the newest comb that has been built for honey storage. Turn it over upside down and cut it out and put it into a Lang, or long Lang. If you go to cutting it apart the chances are you are going to kill or at min P*** off so many it's not funny. Also if this is the hive that just set off the swarm you missed, you have to worry about getting the virgin queen as the mated queen just flew away with the swarm. So if i were you, find it some shade for about two weeks, then come back turn it over and cut it out.
 

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I would set it in conditions as close to those in which you found it and then devise a plan to move the comb into standard frames. I assume it was on the ground, and suspending it on sawhorses or something might cause them to cast more swarms or trigger absconding.
 

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Tilt it, but do it so that the comb inside runs up and down vertically as you put it on edge.
I know the comb is probably curvy, but most of the comb should stay attached this way.

Then cut out the comb, rubber band those straight enough into frames, and sacrifice the rest.

Once I get a cutout hived in a box, I usually screen it in at least until dark, and sometimes for a day or two if the cutout location was nearby, so that they'll reorient when I open it back up.
 
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