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Italian Carniolan hybrid bees
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It’s probably been 2 weeks since I’ve checked on the hive. But recently during an inspection I noticed that the number of bees in the hive plummeted. And the caps on the frame have been chewed on?

Any idea what might have happened?
Brown Beehive Honeycomb Natural material Mesh
Brown Beehive Honeycomb Natural material Mesh
 

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Looks like plenty of nectar

Did you check for mites with a wash to see what the level is?
 

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Italian Carniolan hybrid bees
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It’s been really hot in central tx for the last 3-4 weeks? I’m new to bee keeping and not sure what to do? There’s plenty of wildflowers and water near by?
 

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If you only have a few thousand bees, you may as well start over next spring. The bees need to cluster in cold weather and if there are not a lot of bees they can't stay warm.
Plus the wax moths and hive beetles will move in and finish things off.
Were there a lot of yellow jackets or hornets around the hives? They can clean out a hive in no time.
I had to pinch a queen in a colony that never recovered from a spring swarm. The yellow jackets were walking in and out in a hive box with a reduced entrance. No challenge from the honey bees to keep them from robbing.
Any beekeeping clubs near you? Attend some meetings and talk to the members. Absorb the knowledge.
 

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Possum Valley, TN Bee Wrangler
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Here is a club near you................

 

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Italian Carniolan hybrid bees
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I appreciate all the information y’all. I think I’m going to write this one off and let nature take it’s course. I’m a little bummed out this being my first hive. I don’t know what I could’ve done differently to prevent this outcome?
 

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I appreciate all the information y’all. I think I’m going to write this one off and let nature take it’s course. I’m a little bummed out this being my first hive. I don’t know what I could’ve done differently to prevent this outcome?
The big things one should do is feed the bees, treat for mites, and check the brood and see if the queen is producing enough bees.
When did you start this hive? Quit watching YouTube and go to some beekeeping meetings or the Zoom alternative. Find someone who will let you help while you learn some stuff.
It takes time to learn beekeeping. Do not feel sorry, it has been a challenging year.
I said to not watch YouTube but here is one story that really helped me. It showed me that in beekeeping the more you learn, the more you realize you can succeed.
 

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The big things one should do is feed the bees, treat for mites, and check the brood and see if the queen is producing enough bees.
When did you start this hive? Quit watching YouTube and go to some beekeeping meetings or the Zoom alternative. Find someone who will let you help while you learn some stuff.
It takes time to learn beekeeping. Do not feel sorry, it has been a challenging year.
I said to not watch YouTube but here is one story that really helped me. It showed me that in beekeeping the more you learn, the more you realize you can succeed.
Sorry, I have to disagree with the YouTube statement. The information-rich videos produced by Kamon Reynolds, Bob Binnie and Ian Steppler have almost exclusively guided me through my first three years of beekeeping. The only other source of help I have had is from the other users here on beesource. My closest beeclub is an hour away and my profession leaves me no free time in the spring and summer to make meetings. While I'm sure you can learn a wealth of information from these meetings, the value of these guys videos cannot be understated. There are plenty of clowns on YouTube and their "beekeeping" videos are devoid of good, usable information. However I think advising a new keeper to swear off YouTube when the videos of the above mentioned exist is a mistake. Tap into this valuable resource!
 

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I agree with the excellent value of some of the U Tube offerings, however the sheer volume of dubious advice makes it difficult for a newcomer to sort the wheat from the chaffe!
Until a person attains a certain threshold level of knowledge they can not be very discriminating.
 

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You need to protect your drawn combs from wax moth damage this fall and winter. You will need these to start your new colony next spring. There are several ways to do this. Freeze them if you have freezer space, place them in totes with para moth crystals. spray with bt,and, some say, store them in bright light. That last has never worked for me. If you use moth crystals be sure they are paradichlorabenzine and NOT napthalene..
 

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About 40 Colonies
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Is that all the honey that's in there? It doesn't necessary look robbed, but I guess it could be.
Looks like plenty of nectar

Did you check for mites with a wash to see what the level is?
Plenty of nectar? There is no nectar. There's some wet-ish looking pollen.

Mite wash? He's going to take a 100% sample of his hive. I guess the result will be accurate that way, at least.

The hive is toast.
 

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My closest beeclub is an hour away and my profession leaves me no free time in the spring and summer to make meetings. While I'm sure you can learn a wealth of information from these meetings, the value of these guys videos cannot be understated.
I wouldn't be so sure that there's a wealth of information at those meetings. My experience is that is not the case... a whole lot of rehashing of basic topics that even people who have kept bees for 5-10 years seem to still not grasp. I always found it pretty frustrating. Why am I in a room with beekeepers who have more experience than me who are still struggling with identifying brood, who've never seen eggs, etc. I used to do annual field days for our local group in June every year. The club leader dude had been keeping bees for like 10-12 years when I had the first one. And I showed him his first bee egg, apparently. He'd not seen them before. That is absolutely bananas to me. Come to find out, I think he basically just lost all his bees every winter for about 10 years. Now, he's a very nice guy and all of that. But these are the types of people who typically run bee clubs. Retired, so he's got the time. His heart is in the right place, he sees a need and tries to meet it. He just doesn't have the knowledge and in this case, he's pretty open about that. There's some other people who usually are in those meetings that are usually pretty clueless as well. Nice people, but more of a social experience for people than anything as far as heavy beekeeping knowledge being dispersed.

Totally agree that YouTube is the single best source of beekeeping knowledge on the internet. Unfortunately, it's also the single worst source. And new beekeepers can have a difficult time differentiating between the two.
 

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Sorry, I have to disagree with the YouTube statement. The information-rich videos produced by Kamon Reynolds, Bob Binnie and Ian Steppler have almost exclusively guided me through my first three years of beekeeping. The only other source of help I have had is from the other users here on beesource. My closest beeclub is an hour away and my profession leaves me no free time in the spring and summer to make meetings. While I'm sure you can learn a wealth of information from these meetings, the value of these guys videos cannot be understated. There are plenty of clowns on YouTube and their "beekeeping" videos are devoid of good, usable information. However I think advising a new keeper to swear off YouTube when the videos of the above mentioned exist is a mistake. Tap into this valuable resource!
I get some useful information from our local beekeeping club. I typically attend meetings a couple of times a year to learn where they have their colonies, and see if they are having issues.

Back before COVID they'd have invited speakers, and I got ALOT OF really really good info from those speakers.

Here on beesource, info is more freely given and there's much less tension.
 
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